October 2013

Boston Red Sox Win the World Series In Six Games

For the first time since 1918, the Boston Red Sox have won the World Series Championship in front of their hometown fans, beating the St. Louis Cardinals 6-1 in game six; four games to two overall. The Red Sox become just the second team in MLB history to win the World Series one season after finishing in last place, joining the 1991 Twins.

Truly incredible when you think about it.

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While this was a relatively exciting series, the Cardinals just didn’t have what it took to beat the Red Sox, who were extremely hot at the right time of the year. No player on the Sox was hotter than David Ortiz, who hit .688 with two home runs and six RBI’s in the series, earning him MVP honors. He also holds the distinction of being the second player in Red Sox history to have won three rings with the team — a true Red Sox legend.

Game six was a pitching rematch of game two, with Michael Wacha and John Lackey on the mound for their respective teams. Wacha would have a very uncharacteristic game, allowing six runs through his 3.2 innings pitched. That’s more runs than he had allowed in his previous four postseason starts combined.

The runs came in the third inning, after a good first two innings, on a three-run double by Shane Victorino, and a solo-shot homer by Stephen Drew, along with a few timely hits for a couple more runs, in the fourth. The Sox wouldn’t score again, but the six runs are all proxythey would need.

John Lackey was dominant, going 6.2 innings only giving up a single run. He would exit the game in the sixth, with the bases loaded after a couple of hits and a walk, however, his replacement, Junichi Tazawa, would get Allen Craig to ground out to end the threat. That was the nail in the coffin, as the Cardinals wouldn’t come close to scoring a run again.

Koji Uehara, who’s been fantastic for the Red Sox throughout the regular season and postseason, with a World Series ERA below one, got the final three outs of the game to secure the Red Sox their eighth World Series title in franchise history.

Though my original prediction had the Cardinals winning the World Series in six games — I feel accomplished to have predicted a Red Sox-Cardinals Fall Classic, even though I picked the Red Sox to finish last in my original predictions — I’m alright with the Red Sox winning.

This is just their third Championship in 95 years — going 86 years without a title — so it’s not like they’re beating out everyone else season after season. When they win they truly have a magical year.

Ask any Red Sox fan or player and they’ll tell you this season was just that — magical.

2013 Gold Glove Awards

The 2013 Major League Baseball Gold Glove award winners were announced last night on ESPN2. There were multiple first-time winners, but everyone that won was extremely deserving — though I might not agree with them all.

The Gold Glove Award is an award given out each year to the players that are judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League and the American League, as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. (Managers can not vote for their own players.)

This marks the 56th annual Gold Glove Awards, which began back in 1957.

Here’s a recap of the winners, with my thoughts on each:

CATCHER

AL Nominees- Joe Mauer, Salvador Perez and Matt Wieters

AL Winner- Salvador Perez (1st career)

NL Nominees- A.J. Ellis, Russell Martin and Yadier Molina

NL Winner- Yadier Molina (6th career)

Salvador Perez was the most deserving of this award, among the nominees. While they’re all great players, Perez had the overall better year; becoming the first Royals’ catcher to receive the award since 1989. On the National League side, Yadier Molina winning was an obvious choice. He picks up his sixth career Gold Glove.

PITCHER

AL Nominees- Mark Buehrle, R.A. Dickey and Doug Fister

AL Winner- R.A. Dickey (1st career)

NL Nominees- Patrick Corbin, Zack Greinke and Adam Wainwright

NL Winner- Adam Wainwright (2nd career)

After winning his first career Cy Young award last season, R.A. Dickey picks up his first career Gold Glove. Though he had his share of rough games, he had an overall decent season. But I would’ve liked to have seen Mark Buehrle win. Of the nominees, it was a rather difficult choice for NL, but Adam Wainwright ended up getting the accolade.

LEFT FIELDER

AL Nominees- Yoenis Cespedes, Andy Dirks and Alex Gordon

AL Winner- Alex Gordon (3rd career)

NL Nominees- Carlos Gonzalez, Starling Marte and Eric Young Jr.

NL Winner- Carlos Gonzalez (3rd career)

Alex Gordon picks up his third straight Gold Glove, beating out Andy Dirks and Yoenis Cespedes in the AL. Carlos Gonzalez, like Gordon, received his third career Gold Glove award. Both were deserving, in my mind, and both have the potential to win several more before all is said and done.

CENTER FIELDER

AL Nominees- Lorenzo Cain, Jacoby Ellsbury and Adam Jones

AL Winner- Adam Jones (3rd career)

NL Nominees- Carlos Gomez, Andrew McCutchen and Denard Span

NL Winner- Carlos Gomez (1st career)

After winning a Gold Glove in 2012 — many feel Mike Trout got snubbed — Adam Jones picks up his third career award, as he had another really great year. Carlos Gomez picks up his first career Gold Glove award, for the National League, having a deserving season for the Brewers.

RIGHT FIELDER

AL Nominees- Nick Markakis, Josh Reddick and Shane Victorino

AL Winner- Shane Victorino (4th career)

NL Nominees- Jay Bruce, Jason Heyward and Gerardo Parra

NL Winner- Gerardo Parra (2nd career)

Both Shane Victorino and Gerardo Parra aren’t really acknowledged all that often for their gloves, however, both are really good right fielders for their respective teams. This is Victorino’s fourth Gold Glove, and Parra’s second. Both have the potential to win more down the road.

FIRST BASE

AL NomineesChris Davis, Eric Hosmer and James Loney

AL Winner- Eric Hosmer (1st career)

NL Nominees- Paul Goldschmidt, Adrian Gonzalez and Anthony Rizzo

NL Winner- Paul Goldschmidt (1st career)

Both the National League Gold Glove winner, Paul Goldschmidt, and American League Gold Glove winner, Eric Hosmer, had great seasons, earning them their first career Gold Gloves. Goldschmidt is a top candidate for National League Most Valuable Player — leading the NL in RBI’s and home runs — with Hosmer becoming the first Royals first baseman to win the award.

SECOND BASE

AL Nominees- Robinson Cano, Dustin Pedroia and Ben Zobrist

AL Winner- Dustin Pedroia (3rd career)

NL Nominees- Darwin Barney, Mark Ellis and Brandon Phillips

NL Winner- Brandon Phillips (4th career)

For me, it came down to Dustin Pedroia and Robinson Cano, as both had great seasons and always seem to flash their gloves at some point during nearly every game. Pedroia ended up receiving the Gold Glove, which I’m completely fine with. Brandon Phillips winning his fourth career Gold Glove award is another one I’m fine with. Amazingly talented players on both the AL and NL sides.

SHORT STOP

AL Nominees- Yunel Escobar, Alcides Escobar and J.J. Hardy

AL Winner- J.J. Hardy (2nd career)  

NL Nominees- Ian Desmond, Andrelton Simmons and Troy Tulowitzki  

NL Winner- Andrelton Simmons (1st career)

I was a bit surprised with J.J. Hardy winning, however, I don’t really have a problem with it. He was deserving of the award. Andrelton Simmons was also deserving of the award, as he made some amazing plays this past season and is worthy of his first Gold Glove. Simmons is a player to keep an eye on to win several more in his future.

THIRD BASE

AL Nominees- Adrian Beltre, Evan Longoria and Manny Machado

AL Winner- Manny Machado (1st career)

NL Nominees- Nolan Arenado, Juan Uribe and David Wright 

NL Winner- Nolan Arenado (1st career)

When you’re having to pick between Adrian Beltre, Evan Longoria and Manny Machado for the third base Gold Glove award you run into a problem: They’re all very deserving. But I have to agree with Manny Machado winning, as he had an incredible year, slightly greater than Longoria or Beltre. Nolan Arenado picks up his first career Gold Glove, for the NL, but it’s likely to be just one of many in his career.

2013 GOLD GLOVE AWARDS FAST FACTS

  • There were eight first-time Gold Glove winners.
  • The Royals and Orioles had the most Gold Glove winners, with three apiece.
  • This was the first year that sabermetrics were used as a voting component.
  • Nolan Arenado is just the tenth rookie to ever win a Gold Glove.

Wild Finishes Send World Series Back to Boston

As I wrote in my last blog post, there was a chance coming into St. Louis that either the Cardinals or the Red Sox could win the World Series, should they be able to sweep the other team. But thanks to a couple of wild finished, the series heads back to Boston – the Red Sox lead 3-2 — where a champion will be crowned at Fenway Park for the first time since 1975, when the Reds beat out the Red Sox in seven games. (If the Sox win it will be their first World Series clinch at home since 1918.)

But a lot took place to get to this point.

Going into game three, on Saturday, the Red Sox had Jake Peavy on the mound taking on the Cardinals’ Joe Kelly. Both Peavy and Kelly had been decent this season/postseason, and both were looking to give their team the edge in this talent-laden World Series.

Peavy had a bit of trouble early, allowing a couple runs to the Cardinals in the bottom of the first inning, but he quickly regained himself, not allowing a run the remainder of his four inning outing. Kelly was just a bit better, however, as he gave up only one run over 5.1 innings, when he was replaced by Randy Choate, who promptly gave up the game tying run to the Red Sox.Untitled

The bottom of the seventh saw the Cardinals retaking the lead, on a two-run double by Matt Holliday. But just as to be expected in an exciting World Series game, the Red Sox tied things up in the very next inning. Making the score 4-4, heading into the ninth.

Things would then get interesting.

The Sox failed to score in the top half, as Trevor Rosenthal was dominant once again, giving the Cardinals a chance to walk-off with a big win. Which they did, but not in the most conventional way. A Yadier Molina single was followed up with an Allen Craig pinch-hit double, placing runners at second and third with just one away. Jon Jay would then ground to Dustin Pedroia, who quickly threw home for the out, but a wide throw by Jarrod Saltalamacchia led to the most talked about World Series play in years.

Will Middlebrooks found himself with nowhere to go after diving for the errant throw, leaving third base umpire, Jim Joyce, to signal obstruction, after Allen Craig tripped over Middlebrooks, which would subsequently win the Cardinals the ballgame. Not a way you’d like to see a game of that magnitude end, but you had to figure it would give the Red Sox added motivation in the next game.

Game four didn’t have a controversial finish, but it did end in just as unusual of fashion.

A surprise to many, Clay Buchholz, who had been reported at thirty percent healthy, had a great game for the Red Sox, only allowing a World Series - Boston Red Sox v St Louis Cardinals - Game Foursingle run through his four innings on the mound. Lance Lynn, who isn’t really acknowledged that often, had a great game as well, also giving up a single run through his 5.1 innings pitched.

Although, after Lynn allowed a couple of base runners in the fifth, he was replaced by Seth Maness — a mistake in my mind, as Maness has been getting hit all postseason — who allowed a homer to Jonny Gomes, making the score 4-1, Red Sox.

The Cardinals would score a run in the seventh, and go onto make a push to tie the game in the ninth, but a mistake by rookie Kolten Wong ended the game with everyone stunned. Getting picked off at first by Koji Uehara, Wong became the first player in postseason history to get picked off to end the ballgame.

The series once again became tied, heading into a final game in St. Louis.

A rematch of game one, game six saw Adam Wainwright going up against Jon Lester in a pivotal game. Both Lester and Wainwright pitched well — Wainwright struck out six batters through the first two innings — as they both allowed a mere one run through the first sixUntitled innings.

The one run off of Wainwright came from an RBI-double by David Ortiz, who is now hitting .733 in the series — the only Red Sox player in history with back-to-back 3-hit nights in the Fall Classic. Lester’s lone run came off a solo-shot homer to Matt Holliday — one of Lester’s only four hits allowed.

The Red Sox would get the better of Wainwright in the seventh, scoring two runs to make the score 3-2, Sox. And that’s how the game would end, as Koji Uehara was stellar once again, closing out the game for the Red Sox.

The Cardinals and Red Sox now head back to Boston. It will be interesting to see how each team plays, knowing game six could be it. The way this World Series has been going, however, — especially with Michael Wacha pitching game six for the Cardinals – I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see it go seven games. But, in the end, if I had to pick a favorite at this point in the series, I’d have to give the Red Sox the edge.

We’ll just have to wait and see what happens.

World Series Tied Heading Into St. Louis

Coming into the 2013 World Series the one thing everyone could agree upon, whether you’re rooting for the Cardinals or the Red Sox, was that this was going to be a great Fall Classic. Many people all around the baseball world expected a back and forth series, with several predicting a series of six or seven games. It would seem, if things keep up, that people’s predictions are going to come true.

But game one didn’t turn out to be the pitcher’s dual many envisioned.

dt_common_streams_StreamServerThe Cardinals’ Adam Wainwright went up against the Red Sox’ Jon Lester, in what was supposed to be a close game. But the Red Sox came out swinging. After loading the bases in the bottom of the first, Mike Napoli, who’s been heating up lately, cleared the bases on a double, making it a quick three-run Red Sox lead.

The Sox scored again in the second, off of timely hits. After that, however, neither team would score until the seventh, when David Ortiz – who had been robbed of a grand slam by Carlos Beltran, who was injured on the play, earlier in the game – blasted a home run into the bullpen, tacking on another two runs to extend the lead to seven runs, which would become an eight-run lead in the next inning.

Matt Holliday blasted a homer in the top of the ninth, but it didn’t do any good, as the Red Sox had too big of a lead and were able to take game one, 8-1.

The blowout left many people, myself included, scratching their heads and questioning whether this was going to be the series it had been hyped up to be. But doubts were eliminated in game two, as it brought the type of excitement everyone had been waiting for.

Michael Wacha was dominant yet again for the Cardinals, holding the Red Sox hitless through three innings. Jon Lackey was great as well for the Red Sox, but the Cards would strike first in this game, in the fourth, off of a Matt Holliday triple and a Yadier Molina RBI tapper over Untitledthe pitcher’s head. However, the Red Sox would answer back in the sixth, on a two-run home run from (who else?) David Ortiz, which ultimately knocked Wacha out of the game.

But it didn’t take long for the Cardinals to regain the lead, as in the seventh, after a walk to David Freese, a Jon Jay single, a double-steal, and a walk to Daniel Descalso, the bases became loaded for Matt Carpenter.

Carpenter hit a sacrifice fly left field, which tied the scored up at two runs. Moments later, on the same play, a high throw in an attempt to pick off Jay at third, gave the Cardinals a one-run lead. Then Carlos Beltran — who had been questionable to even play in this game due to an injury the night before — drove in Descalso, making it a 4-2 Cardinals lead, which is where the game would end.

The Red Sox and Cardinals now head to St. Louis tied at a game apiece. Either team has a chance to win the World Series Championship at Bush Stadium if they can sweep, however, with the talent both teams possess, odds are the winner will be crowned at Fenway Park sometime next week.

This could easily turn out to be a World Series for the history books.

Cardinals – Red Sox: World Series Predictions

One of the most difficult tasks every season is predicting which teams will do well enough throughout the year to earn a spot in the postseason. I had trouble myself predicting the teams from the start of the season that would make it, as I did poorly with my American League and National League predictions. But I’ve done really well so far with my postseason predictions. I had the Cardinals and Red Sox making the World Series and that’s exactly what happened.

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A rematch of the 2004 World Series, when the Red Sox swept the Cardinals in four games, this is sure to be one of the best Fall Classics in years. The Red Sox and the Cardinals are very evenly matched and are sure to put on amazing performances throughout the series, which begins on Wednesday night. Both have great pitching staffs, a great lineup and a great bullpen that includes a stellar closer. It will be interesting to watch everything unfold over the coming week or so.

The probable pitchers for games one through seven (five through seven only if necessary*) of the 2013 World Series are as follows:

Game 1: Adam Wainwright (Cardinals) - Jon Lester  (Red Sox)

Game 2: Michael Wacha (Cardinals) - Clay Buchholz (Red Sox)

Game 3: Joe Kelly (Cardinals) - John Lackey (Red Sox)

Game 4: Lance Lynn (Cardinals) - Jake Peavy (Red Sox) 

Game 5*: Adam Wainwright (Cardinals) - Jon Lester (Red Sox)

Game 6*: Michael Wacha (Cardinals) – Clay Buchholz (Red Sox)

Game 7*: Joe Kelly (Cardinals) - John Lackey (Red Sox)

Keep in mind that those could change, however, based on the way everything seems right now, I have the Cardinals winning the World Series in six games. Here’s the way I have things playing out, along with the reasoning to why I have each team winning each particular game:

My pick to win Game 1: Cardinals

Though the World Series is beginning in Boston, I have the Cardinals winning the first game. Adam Wainwright and Jon Lester are both great pitchers, but in the end I feel the Cardinals will get the better of Lester. This is likely to be the best game of the series, as neither teams wants to give up game one; often the pivotal game of the World Series.

My Pick to win Game 2: Cardinals

At just 22 years old, Michael Wacha has been pitching incredibly as of late. He’s going up against Clay Buchholz in game two, who began the season on a hot streak but has been hit or miss recently. I see Wacha once again pitching the Cardinals to a win, putting the Red Sox behind two games early on.

My pick to win Game 3: Red Sox

I’m predicting a bounce back game for the Red Sox, as although Joe Kelly has been great all year long, John Lackey will likely be a bit better. In addition, if in fact they’re down two games, I see the Red Sox putting on a hitting clinic to win game three. They certainly don’t want fall behind by three games in the World Series.

My pick to win Game 4: Red Sox

Once again pulling off a big win to even the series at two games apiece, the Red Sox are going to win game four in my mind. Jake Peavy is going up against Lance Lynn, and the Red Sox are likely to take their win from the night before into game four, where they’ll continue their streak to beat Lynn and the Cardinals.

My pick to win Game 5*: Cardinals

On the mound once again for the Cardinals will be Adam Wainwright, with Jon Lester going for the Sox. I have Wainwright pitching a gem of a game. The Cardinals will beat Lester and the Red Sox, on a great hitting and pitching performance, putting them a game over Boston, to push the series to 3-2.

My pick to win Game 6*: Cardinals

I feel Michael Wacha is going to pitch the best game of his career in game six. In my mind, this will be the final game of the World Series. Though the Red Sox are likely to put up a great fight, with amazing performances night after night, I feel the Cardinals will once again become World Series Champions. Unfortunately for them, in my mind, it will come in Boston.

Who do you have winning the World Series? In how many games? Let me know . . . .

Recapping My Votes for the Major MLB Awards

Over the past week, or so, I’ve been typing up posts on who I feel deserves the awards of American League and National League Most Valuable Player, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year. Some of them have been accepted by nearly everyone as the logical choice, however, a couple left several people disagreeing with me.

Nonetheless, it’s the way I personally feel the awards should go. Will they go the way I’d like? Probably not. But that doesn’t mean I don’t feel strongly about my votes. (I imagine everyone feels that way about their picks.)

In case you missed a few, or all, of my MLB awards post, I wanted to do a brief recap. Here are my picks:

American League MVP: Chris Davis

National League MVP: Paul Goldschmidt

American League Cy Young: Max Scherzer

National League Cy Young: Clayton Kershaw

American League Rookie of the Year: Wil Myers

National League Rookie of the Year: Jose Fernandez

Feel free to click the links associated with each award to be taken to my post on it; giving the reasoning behind my picks.

I’m planning to post a blog entry covering the winners of each award when they’re announced next month, comparing my original picks to the winners and giving my overall thoughts. So be sure to check back for that. I’ll probably have a lot to say about a few of them.

Do you agree or disagree with my picks? Leave a comment below . . . .

My Vote for AL and NL Rookie of the Year

I decided to combine my vote for American League and National League Rookie of the Year (R.O.Y.) into one post, because as hard as I tried to think of a case for several American League players for the award, I couldn’t. Though Jose Iglesias and a few other players had decent rookie seasons, I could only manage to make a strong case for the one player that truly deserves the award and will likely win it with Wil+Myers+Tampa+Bay+Rays+v+Boston+Red+Sox+LdbzEh53jV1loverwhelming support: Wil Myers.

The season Myers was able to put together is truly remarkable. While Myers didn’t lead all AL rookies in every category, as Mike Trout did last year, — several other players this season beat out Myers in average and home runs — when you combine it all together, no one else has the stats for the award.

Batting .293 with 13 home runs and 53 RBI’s in 88 games played, Myers is certainly off to a fast start to his Major League career. A start that should see him receiving the first major award of his career — the Rookie of the Year award.

In the running for National League Rookie of the Year it’s a far different story than the American League portion.

Matt Adams, Evan Gattis, Jedd Gyorko, Yasiel Puig, Julio Teheran, Hyu-Jin Ryu, Shelby Miller and Jose Fernandez are all in the mix for NL Rookie of the Year, in my opinion, but in the end, only a few of them made my final cut. Those players being Shelby Miller, Yasiel Puig and Jose Fernandez. (It’s somewhat difficult to compare two pitchers to a hitter, but I’ll try my best with each case.)

Shelby Miller had a great first season, going 15-9 with a 3.06 ERA. Although he had a decent rookie year, with all of the great candidates for NL Rookie of the Year, Miller didn’t quite do enough to receive the award. But while he won’t win the R.O.Y, Miller is very jose-fernandezlikely to win a Cy Young or two at some point down the road in his career.

Yasiel Puig came up in early June and helped turn around an awful Dodgers team. But while Puig was a big reason for their successful second half of the season, he began to slow down towards the end of the year. Therefore, despite batting .319 with 19 homers and 42 RBI’s this season, Puig will come up just short of winning the award, in my mind.

Jose Fernandez is the only person standing in the way of a relatively easy win for Yasiel Puig. Able to dominate for the Marlins this season, Fernandez posted a 12-6 record with a 2.19 ERA and opponent batting average of .182 — going 9-0 with a 1.19 ERA in home starts this year.

Fernandez isn’t the unanimous pick to win the award by everyone around the baseball world, but his overall dominance at such a young age (21) is enough for me to make him my vote for the National League Rookie of the Year.

Red Sox Turn Slow Start Into Electric Finish

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After nearly getting no-hit, and striking out 17 times, in Game 1 of the American League Championship series on Saturday night, the Red Sox went into Sunday’s game looking to redeem themselves in a pivotal Game 2. Though the Red Sox have done some amazing things in the past — coming back from a 3 game deficit to the Yankees in 2004, to go onto win the World Series — you had to figure that this game was a must win for them the way they’ve been playing lately.

But it wasn’t looking too promising for the Sox early on.

The Tigers came out swinging, putting up a quick five runs. In addition, Max Scherzer was dominant to start the game, as he has been all season long, going 5.2 innings before allowing a hit; a single to Shane Victorino. Dustin Pedroia promptly drove him in, however, for the Sox’ first run of the series, taking their early deficit from five to four runs.

From there, the Red Sox strung together multiple hits in the eighth to load the bases for David Ortiz. As he has done time and time again throughout his career, Ortiz came through, blasting a game tying grand slam into the bullpen.

The Red Sox would go onto win the game in the ninth inning, on a walk-off RBI single from Jarrod Saltalamacchia — truly making this one of the best games in recent postseason history.

Although the Red Sox face a difficult road, going up against Justin Verlander in game three on Tuesday, if Sunday night’s game taught us anything it’s that the Red Sox have the ability to come through no matter how bad the odds seem to be against them.

It looks to be an exciting remainder of the ALCS.

My Vote for National League Cy Young

As I stated in my American League Cy Young post, each season there are usually several pitchers from each league that have incredible seasons, making it difficult to choose between them for who most deserves the Cy Young award. This year, however, it really wasn’t all that close. Matt Harvey, Madison Bumgarner, Zack Greinke, Jose Fernandez and Clayton Kershaw all had great years, but only one of them truly stood above the rest. Regardless, I’ll take the time to go over all of the top candidates anyway.clayton-kershaw

Matt Harvey was a having a Cy Young year until he was shut down in August, due to an arm injuy — an injury that’s resulting in Harvey having to undergo Tommy John surgery this offseason. Regardless of him getting inured, and therefore not receiving the stats necessary to win the award, going 9-5 with a 2.27 ERA, along with getting the start for the NL in the All-Star game, Harvey had a great year.

Madison Bumgarner went 13-9 on the year, with a 2.77 ERA and an opponent batting average of just .203. Still fairly young, Bumgarner is sure to be near the front of the Giants’ rotation for many years to come. Although he didn’t post good enough stats for the Cy Young this season, Bumgarner will likely win one or two at some point during his career.

Zack Greinke had a dominant year for the Dodgers this season — a big part of their successful year. Posting a record of 15-4 with a 2.63 ERA, Greinke is easily one of the top candidates for NL Cy Young. But a mid-season injury that cost him a few starts worth of stats will be enough to keep him from receiving the award, in my opinion.

Jose Fernandez had one of the best rookie seasons for a pitcher in MLB history, going 12-6 with a 2.19 ERA — 9-0 with a 1.19 ERA in home starts — and a .182 batting average against. At just 21 years old, Fernandez is going to be a great player for an extremely long time, and will undoubtedly start an All-Star game or two, in addition to picking up a few Cy Young awards along the way in his career. It just won’t be this season.

The only pitcher that remains is Clayton Kershaw, who is my vote for the National League Cy Young award.

Clayton Kershaw’s 16-9 and MLB-leading 1.83 ERA doesn’t do justice to the season he had. Everytime Kershaw was on the mound the Dodgers liked their chances, and the majority of the time their confidence held true, as Kershaw dominated all year long. Kershaw may not pick up a World Series ring this season – the Dodgers are currently down 2-0 to the Cardinals in the NLCS — but he’s likely to pick up the National League Cy Young award.

My Vote for American League Cy Young

Each season there are usually several pitchers from each league that have incredible seasons, making it difficult to choose between them for who most deserves the Cy Young award. This year, however, it really wasn’t all that close. Bartolo Colon, Hisashi Iwakuma, Anibal Sanchez, Yu Darvish and Max Scherzer all had great years, but only one of them truly stood above the rest. Regardless, I’ll take the time to go over all of the top candidates anyway.

Bartolo Colon had a great season, going 18-6 with a 2.65 ERA, however, he didn’t have nearly good enough of a year to win the Cy Young. His opponent batting average was .264 — fairly bad — and that, combined with a few other stats that just weren’t the best, leave him shimg23755956ort of the credentials needed to win. But having the year he had at the age of 40 is impressive in itself.

Hasashi Iwakuma recorded a mere 14 wins throughout the season, but that’s not the only reason I didn’t pick him. Iwakuma’s 2.66 ERA and .220 batting average against was pretty good, but he didn’t do enough to come close to winning the award. If, however, he can pitch the same, or better, next season as he did this year, Iwakuma stands a chance of receiving the Cy Young down the road.

Anibal Sanchez is one of two Tigers pitchers on my list, and had Verlander pitched throughout the season the way he’s been pitching in the postseason, there would probably be three. Regardless, Sanchez had a career-best season, where he went 14-8 with a 2.57 ERA. As with Iwakuma, a few more wins would’ve made the Cy Young race a bit more interesting.

Yu Darvish was the second best American League pitcher this season, in my opinion. If he could’ve performed the entire season the way he began the year, he would’ve had a good shot at winning. By going 13-9 with a 2.83 ERA, MLB-leading 277 strikeout’s, and .194 opponent batting average, Darvish put together a very good season. But not quite good enough.

That just leaves Max Scherzer, who is the favorite to win the American League Cy Young award.

Scherzer led all pitchers in wins this season with 21 — the only pitcher in baseball to record 20 or more wins — ,going 21-3 on the year. Posting an ERA of 2.90 and a mere .198 batting average against, Scherzer had a Cy Young worthy year. A year that helped lead his team to the postseason, and will likely lead him to his first career Cy Young award.

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