Results tagged ‘ Award ’

Cabrera and Posey Win Most Valuable Player Award

I was extremely surprised with this year’s MVP voting. Not just with the winners of the award from the American League and National League, but also with the blowout fashion in which they won. I don’t feel it should’ve been such a major difference between first and second place in each league, but it is what it is.

In the end, it was Miguel Cabrera taking home the MVP award for the American League, with Buster Posey receiving the MVP award for the National Leauge; as voted on by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America (BBWAA).

This was both Miguel Cabrera’s and Buster Posey’s first Most Valuable Player award.

AMERICAN LEAGUE MOST VALUABLE PLAYER: MIGUEL CABRERA

Original Pick: Mike Trout

Pick after finalists were revealed: Mike Trout

Thoughts On Miguel Cabrera Winning

I can’t believe how much of a landslide the vote for American League Most Valuable Player was. Although I was pulling for Mike Trout, I pretty much expected Miguel Cabrera to win. But to receive 22 of the 28 first place votes is absolutely ridiculous. Even if you think Cabrera was the more valuable player, you can’t honestly tell me that he was THAT much more valuable than Trout. It’s just not true.

So really, I’m not as upset about Miguel Cabrera winning the MVP award as much as I’m upset at how much of a blowout it was. In total, Cabrera beat out Trout by 81 points.

Truly incredible for an award that was supposedly going to be close.

The main reason Cabrera won the MVP award is the fact that he won the Triple Crown–posting a .330 average with 44 homeruns and 139 RBI’s.

While it’s amazing that he was able to accomplish something that hasn’t been done since 1967, I find it necessary to point out that Trout was able to accomplish things no player in the history of baseball has EVER been able to do. Besides, when it comes down to it, just because you posted better stats doesn’t mean you were the more valuable player to your team–which is what the award is all about.

So, while the Triple Crown is an amazing accomplishment for Cabrera, it’s not something you should base your vote on, in my opinion. Especially when Trout was able to one up Cabrera as far as historical occurences go.

Moving on to the second key aspect of Cabrera’s MVP win, I feel the voters’ pushed Trout out of the picture for the sole reason that he and his Angels didn’t make it to the playoffs, while Cabrera and the Tigers made it all the way to the World Series. I truly don’t understand why you would even consider using that as a reason for picking the most valuable player.

If you look at the facts, Cabrera’s Tigers actually had a worse record than the Angels. The reason they made it to the playoffs, while the Angels fell short, is because they played in an easier division. Should Trout be penalized because he played in the difficult AL West, and wasn’t able lead his team to the playoffs? Absolutely not. Making it to the playoffs takes a team effort; Trout could only do so much.

He was still extremely valuable to his team, even though it didn’t result in a playoff run.

So, while Miguel Cabrera received the award, and will go down in the record books as the 2012 AL MVP, when I look back on this season decades from now I’ll always find myself thinking about what should’ve been.

The BBWAA’s vote had Mike Trout finishing second, with Adrian Beltre coming in third.

NATIONAL LEAGUE MOST VALUABLE PLAYER: BUSTER POSEY

Original Pick: Ryan Braun

Pick after finalists were revealed: Ryan Braun

Thoughts On Buster Posey Winning

While I don’t feel as strongly about the National League portion of the MVP award as I do about the American League side, I still think Ryan Braun should’ve won the award; but at the same time, I’m not upset that Buster Posey won.

What it comes down to for me is what the voters’ (once again) decided to base their decision on. I feel like just as with the AL award, the National League MVP didn’t go to the “most valuable” player, but rather the player that was on the more successful team.

Just because Braun’s Brewers didn’t make the playoffs, he was pretty much pushed aside by the voters’ who historically love to see players from playoff teams win the award. (Since 1995, only 6 MVP winners have come from teams that didn’t make the post season.)

So I feel Braun wasn’t given a fair chance in that regard.

The only real complaint I have with the National League MVP award is the fact that Posey beat out Braun by an astounding 137 points. I don’t feel the voting results truly show how close it really was statistically between Braun and Posey. Yet another example of how much stock the BBWAA takes in whether or not a player’s team made the playoffs.

I’m really getting tired of it.

The BBWAA’s vote had Ryan Braun finishing second, with Andrew McCutchen coming in third.

David Price and R.A. Dickey Win Cy Young Award

The 2012 Cy Young award candidates were some of the closest ranked in the history of the award. None more so than the American League portion of the award, where it came down to a mere 4-point difference between first and second place. It was truly THAT close.

While it was too close to call going in to Wednesday night’s Cy Young award announcement, in the end, it was David Price taking home the award for the American League, while R.A. Dickey received the award for the National League; as voted on by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America (BBWAA).

This is both David Price’s and R.A. Dickey’s first career Cy Young award.

AMERICAN LEAGUE CY YOUNG: DAVID PRICE

Original Pick: Jered Weaver

Pick after finalists were revealed: Jered Weaver

Thoughts On David Price Winning

My original pick for the American League Cy Young award was Jered Weaver, and it remained the same after the finalists were revealed last week. With that said, I’m thrilled that David Price won the award.

As stated in a previous blog post, while I was still rooting for Weaver to win, I wouldn’t have been upset with any of the three candidates winning the award. They were all so close statistically that it was hard to pick a winner, because no one candidate really stood above the rest.

The voters seemed to agree, as David Price pulled out the win by a mere 4 points–the closest AL Cy Young vote since 1969.

David Price becomes the first pitcher in Rays’ franchise history to win the Cy Young award, and is certainly deserving of the honor.

Going 20-5 with 205 strikeouts in 211 innings pitched, to go along with a 2.56 ERA, Price had the best year of his career thus far, and is quickly making a case as one of the most dominant pitchers in all of Major League Baseball.

And if this year is any indication, Price (age 27) could be in the running for Cy Young for many years to come.

The BBWAA’s vote had Justin Verlander finishing second, with Jered Weaver coming in third.

NATIONAL LEAGUE CY YOUNG: R.A. DICKEY

Original Pick: Clayton Kershaw

Pick after finalists were revealed: Clayton Kershaw

Thoughts On R.A. Dickey Winning

I had Clayton Kershaw winning the award, but as with the American League portion, I would’ve been happy with any of the three candidates winning; so I’m happy for R.A. Dickey. He was extremely deserving, and it couldn’t have happened to a better guy.

R.A. Dickey was a completely different pitcher this season and really shocked a lot of the baseball world with the type of numbers he was able to post.

Going 20-6 with 230 strikeouts in 233.2 innings pitched, to go along with a 2.73 ERA, Dickey had the best year of his career, in 2012.

Unlike with the AL Cy Young–which had a 4-point difference between the 1st and 2nd place winners–the National League Cy Young voting wasn’t even close, as Dickey beat out Clayton Kershaw by a staggering 113 points; pulling in 27 of the 32 first place votes–finishing no lower than second on every voters’ ballot.

Dickey becomes the Mets’ first 20-game winner since 1990, and the first knuckleball pitcher to EVER win the award. Not bad for a 37-year old pitcher who was considered a bust by many just a few years ago. What a difference a few seasons can make.

The BBWAA’s vote had Clayton Kershaw finishing second, with Gio Gonzalez coming in third.

Trout and Harper Win Rookie of the Year Award

Going into Monday night’s Rookie of the Year announcement, Mike Trout and Bryce Harper were the heavy favorites to win the award. But while nearly every baseball fan across the country agreed that Trout was most deserving of the American League portion of the award, there was great debate as to whether or not Harper was the right choice.

Many people felt the award should go to Wade Miley, with some pushing for Todd Frazier to win. They both posted great rookie numbers, but when the official voting results were revealed, it was Bryce Harper coming out on top; winning by a mere 7 points over Wade Miley, as voted on by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America (BBWAA).

Mike Trout (age 21) becomes the youngest winner of the American League Rookie of the Year award, with Bryce Harper (age 20) being the youngest position player to ever win National League Rookie of the Year.

AMERICAN LEAGUE ROOKIE OF THE YEAR: MIKE TROUT

Original Pick: Mike Trout

Pick after finalists were revealed: Mike Trout

Thoughts On Mike Trout Winning

Since the end of August–going into early September–everyone who followed baseball knew that Mike Trout was a shoo-in to win the Rookie of the Year award for the American League.

Leading all AL rookies in every category there is, Trout rightfully received all 28 first-place votes, becoming only the 8th unanimous AL winner in history, and the first since Evan Longoria, in 2008.

Mike Trout put together one of the most incredible rookie seasons the game has ever seen.

Posting a .326 batting average, with 30 home runs and 83 RBI’s, combined with his 49 stolen bases and 129 runs scored, Trout is the only rookie to ever record a 30 home run, 40 stolen base season.

In addition, Trout is the only PLAYER in MLB history to ever put together a season of at least 45 stolen bases to go along with 125 runs and 30 homers.

Truly incredible.

The BBWAA’s vote had Yoenis Cespedes finishing second, with Yu Darvish coming in third.

NATIONAL LEAGUE ROOKIE OF THE YEAR: BRYCE HARPER

Original Pick: Wilin Rosario

Pick after finalists were revealed: Bryce Harper

Thoughts On Bryce Harper Winning

Although Wilin Rosario was my original pick, I knew it was extremely unlikely that he’d win the award. Harper has been all the baseball world could talk about since appearing on the cover of Sports Illustrated at age 16 as baseballs’ ‘Chosen One’, so for him not to win would have been rather shocking.

So, despite a great year, Rosario ended up finishing fourth–a shame in my opinion–with Harper (as expected) receiving just enough votes to pick up the win for the National League Rookie of the Year award; just edging out Wade Miley, who received a mere 7 less points.

While I’ll admit the vote was closer than I thought it was going to be, I still don’t fully agree with Harper winning. Not because he didn’t post good enough numbers–.270 batting average, 22 HR’s and 57 RBI’s–but because I feel like many of the voters selected Harper for the award for two main reasons: a) he’s only 20 years old, and b) he’s the most popular of the three finalists.

While I feel that neither of those is a good enough reason to vote for Harper, it is what it is. I’m not upset that he won. I’m just upset at the reasoning.

The BBWAA’s vote had Wade Miley finishing second, with Todd Frazier coming in third.

My Vote for American League Cy Young

This is the second in a series of four blog posts that I plan to type up between now and Friday; all of which will focus on who I feel should win the three major awards of Most Valuable Player (MVP), Cy Young and Rookie of the Year (ROY). (If you haven’t read my posts on who I think should win the AL MVP and NL MVP, go ahead and check those out now.)

When making a pick for American League Cy Young, I feel I can rely on stats (and not just personal opinion) more so than I did with Most Valuable Player. Unlike with MVP–where I didn’t let stats influence my decision–stats played a big role in my decision making for AL Cy Young; as the numbers don’t lie.

But don’t get the impression that the decision was an easy one. There are SO many good candidates for AL Cy Young that it made it impossible for me to choose just one player. So I ended up letting the stats do the deciding for me.

I took the American League starting pitchers with ERA’s below 3.00 (Price, Verlander and Weaver) and compared them from 20 different statistical angles. (I chose to use so many different stats to compare them because I felt that using Wins, ERA and strikeouts alone didn’t tell the whole story of how good a particular pitcher was.)

My method works as follows: The pitcher with the best numbers in a given category receives 1 point; with the 2nd and 3rd place pitcher receiving 2 and 3 points, respectively. (The occurence of a tie in a particular category results in the tied players receiving the same point amount.) In the end, the pitcher with the lowest combined total would be my pick for the Cy Young award.

It took me awhile to crunch all of the numbers, but once I finally finished, this was the result:

As stated earlier, the pitcher with the lowest combined total is declared (by me) as the winner. Which makes Jered Weaver the statistical choice (as well as my pick) for AL Cy Young.

I’m a bit shocked by the results, but not THAT shocked. (It’s not like Jered Weaver doesn’t deserve it.) Posting a record of 20-5, with a 2.81 ERA, Weaver is definitely worthy enough. He led the league in opponent batting average (.214), as well as WHIP (1.02), and in addition, pitched a no-hitter on May 2nd against the Twins.

Just icing on the cake for Jered Weaver–my pick for 2012 American League Cy Young.

Do you agree or disagree with me?

As always, feel free to leave a comment below.

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