Results tagged ‘ Joe DiMaggio ’

Derek Jeter Shines In Final Home Game of Career

The Yankees officially fell out of playoff contention on Wednesday, making it just the first time since the 1992-1993 seasons that they have missed the playoffs in back-to-back years. But at Yankee Stadium on Thursday night, no one cared. There was a far more important reason that 48,613 fans (the most at any game this season) spent thousands upon thousands of dollars to jam pack the ballpark.

The reason was Derek Jeter.

Playing in his first home game in which the Yankees were eliminated from the playoffs, Jeter went into this game knowing it would be his finalUntitled game in New York of his career.

Even with that on his mind, the .313 career hitter at Yankee stadium was still able to block out his emotions for the most part (something he’s been able to do extremely well over his career) and focus on the one thing he’s been concerned about for years — winning.

But things didn’t start off as planned, as the first two batters of the game went deep to give the Orioles a quick two-run lead. Taking the fans from an electric crowd to a somewhat stunned crowd, you still figured this was far from where things would end. Not in Jeter’s final game in the Bronx.

As has happened from stadium to stadium throughout this season, due to his preseason announcement that 2014 would be his final year, Jeter received a standing ovation when he made his way to the plate for his first at-bat of the night. The fans knew this would be one of their final opportunities to thank Jeter for the memories, and they took full advantage of it. But the memory making wasn’t done. Not by a long shot.

After working the count a bit, Jeter drove a 3-1 fastball from Kevin Gausman deep to left center, and although everyone immediately thought it was a home run, the ball hit off the wall, allowing Jeter to coast into second with an RBI double — the 544th double, 3,462nd hit and 1,308th RBI of his career. You got the feeling that this was going to be a magical night.

However, the second and third at-bats of the night weren’t much to write home about for Jeter. A weak ground ball which resulted in a a fielder’s choice and a swinging strikeout, respectively, Jeter appeared to be headed for a memorable but fairly uneventful evening as the game rolled on.

But things would quickly change for The Captain.

Coming up with the bases loaded in a 2-2 ballgame for his fourth time at the plate, Jeter grounded to fellow short stop, J.J. Hardy, who made a wide throw to second base, allowing two runs to score on the throwing error. The score became 4-2, Yankees, with Jeter being responsible for two of the Yankees’ four runs. A sacrifice fly by Brian McCann then took the score up to 5-2, which is where things stood when the game moved into the ninth inning.

Before the game even began, many people speculated as to when Derek Jeter would be removed from the game. Many felt it would be with one or two outs in the top of the ninth, but the chance to replace him never occurred. Yankees’ closer, David Robertson, came on and gave up a two-run home run to Adam Jones, followed by a solo shot by Steve Pearce, and just like that the game was tied.

But no one seemed to panic as they normally would.

One look at the lineup card showed that Jeter was due up third in the bottom half.

After a single by Jose Pirela to lead off the bottom of the ninth (Pirela was promptly replaced by a pinch runner), Brett Gardner bunted the runner to second, bringing up Derek Jeter in a tie ballgame with one out.

Wasting no time, Jeter took the first pitch of the at-bat the opposite way into right field, bringing around the game winning run — the first walk off hit for Jeter since June of 2007. With everything having to go exactly right, there’s absolutely no better way the game could’ve ended for Derek FarewellJeter.

He’s a legend — simple as that.

Going down as one of the best short stops in history — right up there with Ozzie Smith, Cal Ripken Jr., etc. — Derek Jeter will be remembered forever.

Not only as one of the greatest to ever play his position, not only as one of the greatest Yankees to play the game, but also as one of the greatest human beings to play the sport. Putting together a near spotless career on and off the field, few will argue that you will never see a player quite like Derek Jeter ever again.

And the fans let Jeter know it when he walked back onto the field after getting the game winning hit. Joined by fellow Yankees legends, Mariano Rivera, Joe Torre, Jorge Posada and Andy Pettitte, among others, Jeter took the time to thank the fans for their support, tipping his cap before taking off down the dugout steps and through the tunnel for the final time of his career.

Playing his entire twenty year career for the Yankees, the first ballot Hall of Famer didn’t have a whole lot to say after the game. As has been the case over his career, Jeter never says more than he wants to say. But he did let his emotions show through a bit, tearing up a bit at times. When asked what he would miss most, Jeter responded, “Everything. But most importantly, I’m going to miss the fans. They’re what made this special”.

The 1996 American League Rookie of the Year, fourteen time All-Star, five time World Series champion, and sixth place player on the all-time hit list accomplished nearly everything he ever dreamed of doing on a baseball field. Growing up, all Jeter ever dreamed of was being the short stop for the Yankees, and he was able to do just that. Dreams really do come true.

With that being his ultimate goal, Jeter made it official after the game that he will never again play short stop, saying he’s going to play in the final three games of the year up in Boston out of respect for the fans, but merely as the designated hitter.

As such, Jeter will undoubtedly get a standing ovation each and every time he steps to the plate up at Fenway park until his final at-bat occurs on Sunday. For a New York Yankee to get that type of respect from rival Red Sox fans, you know he had a truly remarkable career. As he always does, Derek Jeter put it best on Thursday night, simply stating, “I’ve lived the dream.”

Nolan Arenado Sets New Rockies Hit Streak Record

Tallying yet another hit on Thursday night against the Rangers, Nolan Arenado pushed his average for the season up to .322, but more importantly extended his league-leading hitting streak up to a respectable 28 straight games. That puts him first in Rockies’ history in terms of fantasy_g_arenado01jr_200consecutive games with a hit, surpassing Michael Cuddyer’s mark of 27 games, which he set last season.

Sitting halfway from Joe DiMaggio’s all-time hitting streak record of 56 games, it’s far too early to begin talking about Arenado charging past, arguably, the most impressive baseball record of them all — one that many people believe will never be beaten. (If it were to happen, Arenado’s 57th straight game with a hit would come on June 11th in Atlanta).

Nonetheless, what Arenado has been able to do over the past month or so — getting at least one hit in every game since April 9th — has been nothing short of remarkable.

But hitting streak aside, at just 23 years old, Arenado is quickly earning the recognition and respect that he deserves as one of the top young players in the game today.

After becoming just the tenth rookie to ever win a Gold Glove award, for his defense at third base in 2013 that rivals nearly every other infielder in all of baseball, Arenado is on his way to becoming a full on superstar.

And therefore, if you aren’t familiar with Nolan Arenado — perhaps you hadn’t ever heard of him until reading this post? — start paying close attention. Arenado is an extremely exciting player, and from what he’s been able to accomplish so far in his young career, the future would appear to be bright for Arenado (and the resurging Colorado Rockies) moving forward.

Beat the Streak Returns for Its 14th Year

Ever since MLB.com debuted the fantasy baseball style game ‘Beat the Streak’ back in 2001, fans all around the country have been doing their very best to pick up some cash, while at the same time “beating” Joe DiMaggio’s hit streak of 56 games. With a 57-game hit streak of sorts needed to beat the streak and claim the money ($10,000 being the top prize back in 2001), fans have developed all kinds of strategies that they felt certain would help them win the game.

But no one has done it yet — in fourteen years. photo

Truly incredible when you think about it, that not one person has even come close to winning ‘Beat the Streak’, with a fan back in 2007 coming the closest of anyone, amassing a hit streak of 49 games. And therefore, since 2001, MLB.com has upped the prize money. For the past several years, the top prize for breaking the hit streak has been 5.6 million dollars (yes, MILLION). That’s a pretty good prize for a free online baseball game.

The rules of the game are fairly straight forward: Pick up to two players a day that you think are the most likely to get a hit. If the player(s) you selected get a hit, your streak climbs. If, however, your player — or either player, if you pick two in a day — doesn’t get a hit, your streak falls all the way back down to zero. That can be discouraging, especially if you were in a groove and had a good streak going; making this a fun, but somewhat stressful, and seemingly impossible, game to play.

Nonetheless, MLB.com is doing its very best to help someone win the game. Debuting last season was a Dunkin Donuts mulligan, which you could use only once throughout the entire season, but that saved any streak lower than 10, should your chosen player not get a hit. This season, they increased it to a 15-game hit streak, and that could possibly make the mulligan an even bigger help.

But you don’t necessarily have to come close to beating the streak to win some sort of prize. For the first time, the game is offering scratch off cards (electronic ones) that give you the chance of winning MLB game tickets, Dunkin’ Donuts gift cards, MLB.TV subscriptions, merchandise and much more. With all the possible prizes and neat stuff you can get, this year’s ‘Beat the Streak’ could turn out to be the best one yet.

While the odds may seem slim, they’re actually your best odds to win this amount of money. It’s not easy to win ‘Beat the Streak’ by any means, but with your odds of winning 5.6 million dollars being less than one in a million, by many accounts, you stand a better chance of winning this game than you do your local lottery. (Unlike the lottery, where you get one shot, you get multiple chances in a game for your player to get a hit. )

So give it a shot. It doesn’t cost anything, so you have nothing to lose. And who knows, maybe, with a little luck, you’ll be the first person ever to beat the streak and take home the money. That’s definitely worth playing for.

Yasiel Puig Deserves To Be An All-Star This Year

There is currently a great debate going around the baseball world as to whether or not Yasiel Puig should be an All-Star this year. He certainly has the stats to warrant it, but some say he hasn’t been in the major leagues long enough to receive the honor. I for one think Puig deserves to take part in the 2013 All-Star game at Citi Field, on July 16th. 02-yasiel-puig-2

Just taking a look at his insane stats makes it an easy decision for me. Puig is currently batting .440 with 8 home runs and 18 RBI’s, including a .466 on base percentage. While that’s only coming over the course of 28 games, that translates into 116 plate appearances; so it’s not like it’s an extremely small sample size. Puig has proven to be consistent, regardless of the amount of time he’s been in the big leagues.

But it’s not just the physical stats. Puig brings a level of intensity to the field that you don’t find with many other players–it could be argued that he plays even harder than Bryce Harper. He give 110% every game, and never gives up on plays no matter how unlikely they seem. That’s the kind of player I want to see as an All-Star. Just because he doesn’t have a lot of experience, doesn’t mean he doesn’t have a lot of natural talent. That beats experience any day, in my book.

Having the ability to impact any team he’s on–showing that presence by helping to turn around the Dodgers–Puig would be a vital asset to the National League team, in my opinion. As important as the All-Star game has become, I would think they’d want all the help they can get, and that includes a star like Puig.

Puig has been compared to guys such as Bo Jackson, and is coming off of the best first month to start a career since Joe DiMaggio. Anytime you’re associated with names like that, then of course I feel you should be an All-Star. I truly don’t get why some people don’t think Puig should be. Time in the majors doesn’t mean anything when you’re as good as Puig is.

If Puig can keep up his hot start, he could possibly win rookie of the year; if the Dodgers make the playoffs, he stands a good shot to win MVP; but even before all of that, with the way he’s playing, I think he should be an All-Star.

David Ortiz Extends Hit Streak: Worth Watching Yet?

David Ortiz didn’t waste any time extending his hit streak to 27 straight games in Tuesday’s game versus the Twins, singling in his first at-bat of the game. Given, only 15 of the games in Ortiz’s streak have come this year, with the remaining 12 carrying over from last season, but it’s still anmlb_g_ortiz11_600 impressive streak, nonetheless. Which begs the question: When do you need to start paying attention to a hit streak?

To me, a hit streak doesn’t become worthwhile until a player passes the 30 game mark. Up until then, it’s not all that rare of a feat. But once a player begins to climb up through the thirties, as a baseball fan, you generally begin to pay attention–speculating how far the particular player can take it.

Of course, the all-time hit streak is held by Joe DiMaggio, who hit in an unbelievable stretch of 56 straight games, from May 15, 1941 through July 16, 1941. A record which many believe will never be broken–the ultimate feat for a baseball player.

But while it’s a long-shot that Ortiz will go on to pass Joe DiMaggio–if he does, playing in every game, the record breaking hit will take place on June 8th in Boston–many are disputing over whether it should count as a streak at all; saying that a true hit streak is one that takes place over the course of a single season. I somewhat agree, but at the same time, I’d love to see a guy like David Ortiz be the one to break the record. He’s one of those guys who you can’t help but root for.

David Ortiz sits 12 games shy of the all-time hit streak for a designated hitter, and 29 games back of the all-time hit streak in the history of Major League Baseball.

UPDATE

David Ortiz went hitless in his next game, ending his streak at 27 games.

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