Results tagged ‘ John Lackey ’

Indians Head Back to Cleveland Still One Win Away

After witnessing the Indians dominating game one of the World Series and the Cubs coming back to take control of game two, you knew game three was bound to be exciting.

With the series tied at a game apiece, each team would kylecome out wanting to take control of the series and give them the advantage of heading into game four of the first World Series games to be played at Wrigley Field since 1945.

That was certainly the case from the first pitch on Friday night, as the two starters — Josh Tomlin for the Indians and Kyle Hendricks for the Cubs — were absolutely terrific the first time through the opposing team’s order, despite neither being power-pitchers and the disadvantage of having the wind blowing out.

While games one and two failed to live up to the billing of a pitcher’s dual, game three turned out to be the game everyone had been waiting for, as neither starting pitcher allowed a single run over the first four innings and essentially were breezing through every batter they faced.

The first struggles of the game for Hendricks came in the fifth inning, when the bases became loaded with just one out. Due to the situation, Hendricks was removed from the game, and was replaced by Justin Grimm, who promptly got Francisco Lindor to ground into a double play; despite having gone 5-9 previously in the postseason, and being the first player age 22 or younger to start a World Series 5-9 since Mickey Mantle.

Tomlin was replaced in the sixth inning by Andrew Miller, who once again was untouchable, doing his part in keeping the game scoreless through the seventh inning, and punching the new record for scoreless innings by a reliever in the postseason, with 15 straight. It was also in that inning when the Indians would finally put something together.

millerA pinch-hit single from Coco Crisp, who had previously gone 3-18 in the playoffs, scored pinch-runner Michael Martinez from third, giving the Indians a 1-0 lead in the late innings. With the way this game was going, you quickly got the feeling that it was going to be difficult for the Cubs to rally back.

Although Bill Murray attempted to get the Cubs motivated before their at-bats in the seventh with his Daffy-Duck-edition of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame”, it wouldn’t do much good in the end, despite getting the crowd in a lightened mood late in the ballgame.

The Cubs would set themselves up nicely in that very inning, as well as several more times in the game — including the ninth inning, where they had runner on second and third with two outs — but they weren’t able to come through and ended up losing the close game and falling behind the Indians two games to one in the series.

With the win, the Indians marked their fifth shutout pitching performance of their postseason thus far (a new MLB record), and also secured just the 25th time in the 649-game history of the World Series that a game ended with a final score of 1-0. In addition, the last time the Cubs were shutout in the World Series 1-0 came way back in 1918, seeing Babe Ruth throw a shutout against Chicago, leaving little doubt that this series is something historic.

Although the game was thrilling for baseball fans, it was obviously a disappointing loss for the Cubs and their fan base, as it guaranteed they could no longer win the series at Wrigley Field in front of their home crowd. Furthermore, falling one game further away from finally breaking their 108-year World Series championship drought, the Cubs would have to come back the next night and even up the score if they wanted to avoid sitting just one loss away from elimination altogether. You began to get the feeling that game four was going to be another absolute battle.

Game four began just that way, with John Lackey going up against Corey Kluber, who had been terrific in game one. But this time around, it was Lackey who began strong, with Kluber giving up a run in the first, after allowing a drop-in double to Dexter Fowler, and a single up the middle from Anthony Rizzo, making the score 1-0 Cubs.santana

But before the Cubs fans were able to settle back into their seats, Lackey gave up a run of his own via a solo home run to Carlos Santana in the second, marking the first home run by a first baseman in the World Series at Wrigley Field since Lou Gehrig in 1932. Then, following an error by Bryant which allowed Lonnie Chisenhall to reach first — he was moved to second by Perez with two outs — the next batter, Tyler Naquin, was walked to get to the pitcher.

But Kluber proceeded to hit a weak tapper that was thrown wildly by Bryant for his second error of the game, allowing Chisenhall to score and give the Indians a one-run lead. Once again, the next inning, after a leadoff double by Kipnis, the Indians would score when Lindor singled him home, giving the Indians a 3-1 lead.

Neither team would score again for the next two innings, but the Indians were back at it again in the sixth. Mike Montgomery, the reliever for Lackey, gave up a leadoff walk to Lindor, a single to Santana, and a ground out that made it first and third with one out. The next batter Chisenhall then blasted a ball deep enough into the outfield to allow Lindor to score and make it 4-1.

The Cubs would attempt to answer back in the bottom half when a leadoff double from Rizzo got the crowd amped up, but yet again the Cubs couldn’t make it count, failing to get another hit in the inning.

kipnisThe Indians, however, couldn’t stop hitting all night long. Leading off the seventh with a double was Coco Crisp, who advanced to third on a wild pitch with no outs. Rajai Davis was then drilled with the next pitch, and Jason Kipnis ended up launching a three-run bomb to push the lead to six runs.

With that hit, the fans went absolutely silent, especially with Andrew Miller entering the game. But Miller proved that he was in fact human, giving up a homer to Fowler in the eighth inning. Still, the Cubs weren’t able to get anywhere close to threatening the Indians 7-2 lead, as Cleveland was victorious for the second straight night and moved just one win away from winning it all.

Down 3-1 in the series, Sunday night’s game was a win or go home game for the Cubs. If they had any shot at extending their season, they would quite simply have to start getting big hits in game five or they wouldn’t stand a chance against the Indians. Though the odds were against them, the majority of the baseball world was with them, hoping they could find a way to keep the season going just a little while longer.

Jon Lester certainly gave the Cubs’ fans plenty to cheer about in the very first inning, looking sharp and striking out the side to begin the game — the first National League pitcher to do so since John Smoltz in 1996. Equally sharp, however, was Trevor Bauer, who kept the Cubs off the board as well to begin the ballgame.

The second inning was deja vu for the Cubs, as it saw the Indians once again taking an early lead off of a Jose Ramirez solo shot — the youngest player to hit a World Series homer at Wrigley Field since Joe DiMaggio in 1938. Citing thebryant fact that the Indians had won their last fifteen games in which they had hit a home run, going back to the regular season, the odds were slowly falling away from a Cubs victory.

But then the fourth inning happened. Despite Bauer being terrific through the first three innings, his second time through the order proved troublesome. The Cubs bats absolutely came alive, as following a Kris Bryant leadoff home run, Anthony Rizzo proceeded to double off the outfield wall and later scored after a couple of well-placed singles. The bases would quickly become loaded after an out was recorded, and the veteran David Ross would deliver a sacrifice fly, scoring the Cubs’ third run of the inning, making it 3-1.

Despite Wrigley Field hopping following the breakout inning, the Indians would cool things down a bit, leading off the fifth inning with a double from Carlos Santana, who was moved to third with just one out. But a terrific job of pitching by Lester kept the Indians from scoring a single run.

That would only last through the sixth inning, however, when a two-out drop-in single by Francisco Lindor scored the second run of the contest for the Indians. After finishing out that inning, Lester’s night was done. His replacement, Carl Edwards Jr., was shaky to begin, giving up a single to Mike Napoli and allowing him to advance to second withchapman no outs on a passed ball. But Chapman was brought on, who kept things from getting out of hand.

Chapman would stay in for the eighth inning, and although he would allow a runner to make it all the way to third with two outs, a 102 mile-per-hour heater got the strikeout he needed to escape the inning untouched. After little getting through the eighth, Chapman was entrusted with the ninth inning as well, getting the job done in quick fashion, and securing the victory for Chicago with a lengthy eight-out save performance.

With the win, the Cubs move to 3-2 in the series. Although still at a disadvantage heading back into enemy territory down a game, you know the Cubs are at the very least going to be very competitive and not go down without a fight. History is still in the process of being made. After 108 years of disappointment, the Cubs are by no means done in their attempt at achieving baseball glory.

First for Cubs: World Series or All-Star Game?

It was reported recently that Wrigley Field will be the site of the Major League Baseball All-Star game sometime in the very near future. Logic would point to them being the hosts in 2019, after the All-Star game has been on display in San Diego this season, Miami in 2017 and Washington D.C. two years down the road. However, no official announcement has been made as to the exact year the midsummer classic will be held up in Chicago.Cubs

The last time the Cubs hosted the All-Star game was back in 1990, with standout players such as Wade Boggs, Ken Griffey Jr. and Rickey Henderson, among many others, leading the American League to a 2-0 win over the National League. With such a long drought, it would seem only right that the Cubs receive another All-Star game.

Even so, as everyone around the baseball world knows, it’s not the 26-year All-Star game drought that the Cubs are famous for; it’s their 71-year World Series appearance drought (108 years since their last World Series title). But despite the fact that the Titanic sinking is more recent history than the last World Series Championship for the Cubs, there are many people who believe that 2016 could finally (this time for sure) be the Cubs’ year.

Currently possessing an unbelievable roster — even better than the one that took them to the postseason in 2015 — the Cubs appear to be in good shape headed into this year. They added veteran John Lackey this offseason to their already good rotation of Jon Lester and Jake Arrieta. Combine that with the pickup of Jason Heyward to man the outfield, and young stars Kris Bryant, Kyle Schwarber, Addison Russell and Anthony Rizzo looking to build on great 2015 campaigns, the Cubs are definitely a team to watch closely this coming season.

With all of their talent, however, comes the question of which is more probable to come first: a World Series Championship for the Cubs or an All-Star game at Wrigley Field?

Given that Chicago (as previously stated) won’t be able to host the All-Star game until at least 2019, the Cubs have three full seasons to realize the dream that has been used as a trivia question for decades. But just getting to the Fall Classic is extremely difficult, as has been proven in the past, so your guess for which comes first is just as good as mine.

Despite all of that, I have to find myself believing in the Cubs and their chances of finally winning the World Series in the next three seasons. Sure, some of that belief may just be me as a baseball fan hoping for the Cubs to break their century-long World Series drought, but I honestly think they have a group of guys that can pull it off. Only time will tell if they win a title before they once again host an All-Star game, but after 108 years of disappointment, why can’t 2016 (or 2017 . . . or 2018) be their year?

Red Sox Down, But Not For Long

No matter how you look at it, the Boston Red Sox are having a poor season. Despite a great deal of anticipation surrounding the team for 2014 after winning the World Series last year, the Sox currently hold the last place position in the American League East division. With a better win-loss record (13 games under .500) than only the Astros and the Rangers in all of the American League, the Red Sox have lost all their hope for the 2014 season being a memorable one — memorable in a good way, that is.Red Sox

Any remaining hope that the Sox did have was diminished last week just before the trade deadline when they made several trades that sent some of their key players off to other teams. Most significantly, Jon Lester being sent out to Oakland in exchange for Yoenis Cespedes, who should provide some pop to a struggling Red Sox outfield, was a big blow to the team.

While Cespedes is a fantastic player, and will undoubtedly help the Sox moving forward, Lester was an ace, and aces are extremely valuable. A team simply isn’t the same after loosing such a valuable asset, and it will certainly show.

But Lester wasn’t the only Red Sox pitcher who changed uniforms. Also getting sent packing were John Lackey and Jake Peavy, who brought back Allen Craig and Joe Kelly, and a couple of minor league prospects, respectively.

Though David Ortiz, Dustin Pedroia, Mike Napoli, and breakout Brock Holt, have been big parts to the Red Sox team this year, coming through big in games, there have been too many injuries to have the Sox make any sort of run towards making the playoffs. Last season everything seemed to go right every single day of the year, but this season things are just the opposite, with players not being able to get on a roll.

With a mere 51 games left to their season, the Red Sox are beginning to look to the future for signs of better things to come. And, fortunately for them, they have an unbelievable amount of young talent set to contribute to the Sox as soon as the 2015 season, leading many to envision big things for them next year.

Consisting of Mookie Betts, Henry Owens, Blake Swihart, Garin Cecchini, Allen Webster, Anthony Ranaudo and Christian Vazquez, all of which are age 24 or younger, the Sox have seven of their top ten prospects currently at Triple-A or in the major leagues, leaving them with numerous options to help improve their ball club shortly down the road.

Two of those multiple options were just recently promoted to Triple-A, in Henry Owens and Blake Swihart, however, they are arguably the most talented of any players in the Red Sox farm system.

052414_6847-MOwens holds a 15-4 record between Double-A and Triple-A this year, with an ERA of 2.47, after an outstanding Triple-A debut on Monday night. Swihart is hitting an even .300, with a career high 12 home runs and 55 RBI’s to this point in the season.

Though it isn’t likely that either one will be a September call up, seeing that the Red Sox are out of things, both could play huge roles in a resurgence for the Red Sox in 2015.

As far as Mookie Betts, Garin Cecchini, and the remaining, previously mentioned prospects go, all have seen some major league time at some point this season, and while none of them blew people away by posting amazing stats, they each are expected to have bright big league futures.

Once the Red Sox’ top prospects begin to reach the big league level and stick, combining their talents with the likes of the always consistent David Ortiz, newcomer Yoenis Cespedes, and star second baseman, Dustin Pedroia, the Sox should begin to see things turn around.

With there being rumors that the Red Sox could potentially resign Jon Lester this coming offseason to a deal for 2015 and beyond, despite 2014 being a down year, next year could wind up being the year the Red Sox begin to see that expected major turn around to their overall team. If all goes as predicted (given, that hardly ever happens), 2015 could turn out to be a very special season.

Boston Red Sox Win the World Series In Six Games

For the first time since 1918, the Boston Red Sox have won the World Series Championship in front of their hometown fans, beating the St. Louis Cardinals 6-1 in game six; four games to two overall. The Red Sox become just the second team in MLB history to win the World Series one season after finishing in last place, joining the 1991 Twins.

Truly incredible when you think about it.

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While this was a relatively exciting series, the Cardinals just didn’t have what it took to beat the Red Sox, who were extremely hot at the right time of the year. No player on the Sox was hotter than David Ortiz, who hit .688 with two home runs and six RBI’s in the series, earning him MVP honors. He also holds the distinction of being the second player in Red Sox history to have won three rings with the team — a true Red Sox legend.

Game six was a pitching rematch of game two, with Michael Wacha and John Lackey on the mound for their respective teams. Wacha would have a very uncharacteristic game, allowing six runs through his 3.2 innings pitched. That’s more runs than he had allowed in his previous four postseason starts combined.

The runs came in the third inning, after a good first two innings, on a three-run double by Shane Victorino, and a solo-shot homer by Stephen Drew, along with a few timely hits for a couple more runs, in the fourth. The Sox wouldn’t score again, but the six runs are all proxythey would need.

John Lackey was dominant, going 6.2 innings only giving up a single run. He would exit the game in the sixth, with the bases loaded after a couple of hits and a walk, however, his replacement, Junichi Tazawa, would get Allen Craig to ground out to end the threat. That was the nail in the coffin, as the Cardinals wouldn’t come close to scoring a run again.

Koji Uehara, who’s been fantastic for the Red Sox throughout the regular season and postseason, with a World Series ERA below one, got the final three outs of the game to secure the Red Sox their eighth World Series title in franchise history.

Though my original prediction had the Cardinals winning the World Series in six games — I feel accomplished to have predicted a Red Sox-Cardinals Fall Classic, even though I picked the Red Sox to finish last in my original predictions — I’m alright with the Red Sox winning.

This is just their third Championship in 95 years — going 86 years without a title — so it’s not like they’re beating out everyone else season after season. When they win they truly have a magical year.

Ask any Red Sox fan or player and they’ll tell you this season was just that — magical.

World Series Tied Heading Into St. Louis

Coming into the 2013 World Series the one thing everyone could agree upon, whether you’re rooting for the Cardinals or the Red Sox, was that this was going to be a great Fall Classic. Many people all around the baseball world expected a back and forth series, with several predicting a series of six or seven games. It would seem, if things keep up, that people’s predictions are going to come true.

But game one didn’t turn out to be the pitcher’s dual many envisioned.

dt_common_streams_StreamServerThe Cardinals’ Adam Wainwright went up against the Red Sox’ Jon Lester, in what was supposed to be a close game. But the Red Sox came out swinging. After loading the bases in the bottom of the first, Mike Napoli, who’s been heating up lately, cleared the bases on a double, making it a quick three-run Red Sox lead.

The Sox scored again in the second, off of timely hits. After that, however, neither team would score until the seventh, when David Ortiz — who had been robbed of a grand slam by Carlos Beltran, who was injured on the play, earlier in the game — blasted a home run into the bullpen, tacking on another two runs to extend the lead to seven runs, which would become an eight-run lead in the next inning.

Matt Holliday blasted a homer in the top of the ninth, but it didn’t do any good, as the Red Sox had too big of a lead and were able to take game one, 8-1.

The blowout left many people, myself included, scratching their heads and questioning whether this was going to be the series it had been hyped up to be. But doubts were eliminated in game two, as it brought the type of excitement everyone had been waiting for.

Michael Wacha was dominant yet again for the Cardinals, holding the Red Sox hitless through three innings. Jon Lackey was great as well for the Red Sox, but the Cards would strike first in this game, in the fourth, off of a Matt Holliday triple and a Yadier Molina RBI tapper over Untitledthe pitcher’s head. However, the Red Sox would answer back in the sixth, on a two-run home run from (who else?) David Ortiz, which ultimately knocked Wacha out of the game.

But it didn’t take long for the Cardinals to regain the lead, as in the seventh, after a walk to David Freese, a Jon Jay single, a double-steal, and a walk to Daniel Descalso, the bases became loaded for Matt Carpenter.

Carpenter hit a sacrifice fly left field, which tied the scored up at two runs. Moments later, on the same play, a high throw in an attempt to pick off Jay at third, gave the Cardinals a one-run lead. Then Carlos Beltran — who had been questionable to even play in this game due to an injury the night before — drove in Descalso, making it a 4-2 Cardinals lead, which is where the game would end.

The Red Sox and Cardinals now head to St. Louis tied at a game apiece. Either team has a chance to win the World Series Championship at Bush Stadium if they can sweep, however, with the talent both teams possess, odds are the winner will be crowned at Fenway Park sometime next week.

This could easily turn out to be a World Series for the history books.

Fried Chicken Anyone?!?

I normally try to stick to writing no more than a single blog entry a day, but I just had to get my thoughts out about this. I’m guessing that you’ve already heard about what was occuring in the clubhouse of the Red Sox during some of last months games. If you haven’t heard, you’re in for a shock. Josh Beckett, Jon Lester and John Lackey spent the games that they weren’t pitching in, in the clubhouse chowing down on biscuits and fried chicken, drinking beer, and playing video games. (I at least hope it was MLB 11: The Show.)

Could all of that food and games have caused the Red Sox September demise? Well, maybe. But the behind the scenes eating and drinking, in the clubhouse, more than likely only partially caused the Red Sox playoffs chances to slowly vanish before their eyes. Terry Francona may have not of been fully focused on the prize, due to marital problems he had been having with his wife, Jacque. These marital problems, which ultimately caused Francona to move out and live in a hotel for most of the 2011 season, along with the pain medication he was taking, may have been enough to distract him for much of the season. When confronted about this by the Boston Gobe, Francona strongly denied the statements, saying:

It makes me angry that people say these things because I’ve busted my [butt] to be the best manager I can be. I wasn’t terribly successful this year, but I worked harder and spent more time at the ballpark this year than I ever did.

I kind of agree with Francona. I believe that he’s just as much of a professional as any manager in the game. I have a hard time believing that he would allow his personal problems to interfere greatly with his job as the Red Sox manager. No matter the case, Francona was fired as the manager of the Red Sox, on September 30th. Which leaves the question of: What’s next for the Red Sox?

With their star pitchers chowing down on junk food, and a manager position to fill what will happen to the Red Sox in the 2012 season? To make matters worse, their GM, Theo Epstein, is reportedly leaving the Sox for the Cubs. (20 million/5 years.) With no general manager, no manager, and star players acting like this is high school ball, do the Red Sox have any shot at success in the 2012 season?