Results tagged ‘ Michael Wacha ’

Top Ten Contracts I’d Give to Young Stars

With Clayton Kershaw recently receiving a 7-year, 215 million dollar deal from the Dodgers, I thought I’d go over the top young players Kershaw’s age (26 at the start of the season) or younger without extended contracts, with at least 100 games played or 100 innings pitched, that I feel would be worth a large deal (not necessarily of Kershaw’s magnitude).

Keep in mind, the players on my list might never get contracts of this amount, or they could be offered larger ones — depending on what their respective team can afford. I’m not trying to project what the future holds for each player money wise, I’m just giving my take on what I feel they’re worth, and over what period of time. Also, the players are in order of total dollar amount, not necessarily their talent level, as some positions are simply worth more money than others.

With all that said, here is my top ten list:

1.) Mike Trout — 22 years old: Contract of 10 years, 310 million dollars

There’s no doubt in my mind that Mike Trout is eventually going to receive a massive contract. After winning the 2012 American League Rookie of the Year award and going on to have an even better 2013 season, Trout is worth every dollar. At just 22 years old, Trout is the only player on my list that I’d give a 10 year contract to, with my contract coming out to 31 million a year, which would make him the highest paid player in MLB history. But he’s just going to get better and better.

2.) Giancarlo Stanton — 24 years old: Contract of 6 years, 130 million dollars

If Giancarlo Stanton had been completely healthy over the last couple of seasons, he’d probably be receiving more money in my contract. But citing the health issues, especially last season, I decided to give him just under 22 million a year. When healthy, he is a 30-40 home run player, and is just as deserving of a huge contract as Mike Trout.

3.) Freddie Freeman — 24 years old: Contract of 6 years, 100 million dollars

Many had Freddie Freeman in the running for the 2013 National League Most Valuable Player award, but while he didn’t win (Andrew McCutchen ended up taking home the honor) that doesn’t take anything away from the season Freeman had. At just 23 years old, Freeman recorded his first 100 RBI season last year, and should continue to be that type of player moving forward. Therefore, I’d lock him up until age 30, providing him with just under 17 million a season.

4.) Jose Fernandez — 21 years old: Contract of 5 years, 100 million dollars

If Jose Fernandez can perform all next season the way he did in 2013, he will be worth even more than this. Fernandez blew away the opposition last season, going 12-6 with a 2.19 ERA, and winning the National League Rookie of the Year award — even placing third in Cy Young award voting. At just 21 years old, Fernandez is going to be very good for a very long time, but I played it safe, for now, giving him 20 million a season (yes, I know that’s a ton for a player of his age) for the next five years. After that, sky’s the limit.

5.) Manny Machado — 21 years old: Contract of 6 years, 85 million dollars

Manny Machado could end up being worthy of the second largest contract of the players on my list, as he is capable of turning into a complete, superstar player a few years down the road, but for now he sits at number five. That’s no knock to him, however. He’s just 21 years old, and has already shown flashes of being one of the top two or three players in all of baseball. But if I had to offer him a contract tomorrow, I’d give him roughly 14 million a year until he turns 27.

6.) Stephen Strasburg — 25 years old: Contract of 5 years, 80 million dollars

Though he’s had a few good seasons (after undergoing Tommy John surgery in 2010) Stephen Strasburg hasn’t yet broken out as that super dominant pitcher many feel he can be, going 8-9 with a 3.00 ERA in 2013. Therefore, I have him at number six on my list, with a contract of 16 million a year until he turns 30. But a few good seasons could easily move him way up.

7.) Craig Kimbrel — 25 years old: Contract of 5 years, 75 million dollars

There is, arguably, no one better at closing out games at the moment (now that Mariano Rivera has retired) than Craig Kimbrel. Posting 40 or more saves each of the past three years, Kimbrel has overpowering stuff, and should continue to dominate as the Braves’ closer for years to come. I don’t normally like relief pitchers getting big contracts, but Kimbrel is the exception, with me giving him a contract worth 15 million a year.

8.) Bryce Harper — 21 years old: Contract of 5 years, 70 million dollars

This was difficult for me, putting Bryce Harper all the way down at number eight. He’s been hyped since the age of sixteen, and it hasn’t slowed since Harper reached the majors in 2012. But he’s just a bit “out of control” for me to place him any higher; at least for now. If he can get everything together, he has the potential to be a true five-tool player, and earn a mega-contract. From what I’ve seen so far, however, I’d give him five years to figure things out, giving him 14 million a season.

9.) Addison Reed — 25 years old: Contract of 5 years, 65 million dollars

Addison Reed — recently traded to the Diamondbacks from the White Sox — is one of the most dominant and reliable closers in all of baseball. Though he is somewhat of a question mark in terms of earned runs allowed per outing, Reed has very dominant stuff, and recorded 40 saves last season. He should remain a feared ninth inning man for years to come, earning him 13 million until he turns 30, in my book.

10.) Matt Harvey — 25 years old: Contract T.B.D.

The fact that Matt Harvey missed the last few games of 2013 and will miss the entire 2014 season, due to Tommy John surgery, and yet still makes my top ten speaks volumes for the type of player he is. Getting the start for the 2013 All-Star game, Harvey had a magnificent year, going 9-5 with a 2.27 ERA, and really put his name on the map. Once healthy, he should get a hefty contract. (It’s hard to say for sure how much he’s worth, which is why I left that to be determined down the road.)

Do you agree or disagree with my top ten? Leave a comment below.

Boston Red Sox Win the World Series In Six Games

For the first time since 1918, the Boston Red Sox have won the World Series Championship in front of their hometown fans, beating the St. Louis Cardinals 6-1 in game six; four games to two overall. The Red Sox become just the second team in MLB history to win the World Series one season after finishing in last place, joining the 1991 Twins.

Truly incredible when you think about it.

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While this was a relatively exciting series, the Cardinals just didn’t have what it took to beat the Red Sox, who were extremely hot at the right time of the year. No player on the Sox was hotter than David Ortiz, who hit .688 with two home runs and six RBI’s in the series, earning him MVP honors. He also holds the distinction of being the second player in Red Sox history to have won three rings with the team — a true Red Sox legend.

Game six was a pitching rematch of game two, with Michael Wacha and John Lackey on the mound for their respective teams. Wacha would have a very uncharacteristic game, allowing six runs through his 3.2 innings pitched. That’s more runs than he had allowed in his previous four postseason starts combined.

The runs came in the third inning, after a good first two innings, on a three-run double by Shane Victorino, and a solo-shot homer by Stephen Drew, along with a few timely hits for a couple more runs, in the fourth. The Sox wouldn’t score again, but the six runs are all proxythey would need.

John Lackey was dominant, going 6.2 innings only giving up a single run. He would exit the game in the sixth, with the bases loaded after a couple of hits and a walk, however, his replacement, Junichi Tazawa, would get Allen Craig to ground out to end the threat. That was the nail in the coffin, as the Cardinals wouldn’t come close to scoring a run again.

Koji Uehara, who’s been fantastic for the Red Sox throughout the regular season and postseason, with a World Series ERA below one, got the final three outs of the game to secure the Red Sox their eighth World Series title in franchise history.

Though my original prediction had the Cardinals winning the World Series in six games — I feel accomplished to have predicted a Red Sox-Cardinals Fall Classic, even though I picked the Red Sox to finish last in my original predictions — I’m alright with the Red Sox winning.

This is just their third Championship in 95 years — going 86 years without a title — so it’s not like they’re beating out everyone else season after season. When they win they truly have a magical year.

Ask any Red Sox fan or player and they’ll tell you this season was just that — magical.

Wild Finishes Send World Series Back to Boston

As I wrote in my last blog post, there was a chance coming into St. Louis that either the Cardinals or the Red Sox could win the World Series, should they be able to sweep the other team. But thanks to a couple of wild finished, the series heads back to Boston – the Red Sox lead 3-2 — where a champion will be crowned at Fenway Park for the first time since 1975, when the Reds beat out the Red Sox in seven games. (If the Sox win it will be their first World Series clinch at home since 1918.)

But a lot took place to get to this point.

Going into game three, on Saturday, the Red Sox had Jake Peavy on the mound taking on the Cardinals’ Joe Kelly. Both Peavy and Kelly had been decent this season/postseason, and both were looking to give their team the edge in this talent-laden World Series.

Peavy had a bit of trouble early, allowing a couple runs to the Cardinals in the bottom of the first inning, but he quickly regained himself, not allowing a run the remainder of his four inning outing. Kelly was just a bit better, however, as he gave up only one run over 5.1 innings, when he was replaced by Randy Choate, who promptly gave up the game tying run to the Red Sox.Untitled

The bottom of the seventh saw the Cardinals retaking the lead, on a two-run double by Matt Holliday. But just as to be expected in an exciting World Series game, the Red Sox tied things up in the very next inning. Making the score 4-4, heading into the ninth.

Things would then get interesting.

The Sox failed to score in the top half, as Trevor Rosenthal was dominant once again, giving the Cardinals a chance to walk-off with a big win. Which they did, but not in the most conventional way. A Yadier Molina single was followed up with an Allen Craig pinch-hit double, placing runners at second and third with just one away. Jon Jay would then ground to Dustin Pedroia, who quickly threw home for the out, but a wide throw by Jarrod Saltalamacchia led to the most talked about World Series play in years.

Will Middlebrooks found himself with nowhere to go after diving for the errant throw, leaving third base umpire, Jim Joyce, to signal obstruction, after Allen Craig tripped over Middlebrooks, which would subsequently win the Cardinals the ballgame. Not a way you’d like to see a game of that magnitude end, but you had to figure it would give the Red Sox added motivation in the next game.

Game four didn’t have a controversial finish, but it did end in just as unusual of fashion.

A surprise to many, Clay Buchholz, who had been reported at thirty percent healthy, had a great game for the Red Sox, only allowing a World Series - Boston Red Sox v St Louis Cardinals - Game Foursingle run through his four innings on the mound. Lance Lynn, who isn’t really acknowledged that often, had a great game as well, also giving up a single run through his 5.1 innings pitched.

Although, after Lynn allowed a couple of base runners in the fifth, he was replaced by Seth Maness — a mistake in my mind, as Maness has been getting hit all postseason — who allowed a homer to Jonny Gomes, making the score 4-1, Red Sox.

The Cardinals would score a run in the seventh, and go onto make a push to tie the game in the ninth, but a mistake by rookie Kolten Wong ended the game with everyone stunned. Getting picked off at first by Koji Uehara, Wong became the first player in postseason history to get picked off to end the ballgame.

The series once again became tied, heading into a final game in St. Louis.

A rematch of game one, game six saw Adam Wainwright going up against Jon Lester in a pivotal game. Both Lester and Wainwright pitched well — Wainwright struck out six batters through the first two innings — as they both allowed a mere one run through the first sixUntitled innings.

The one run off of Wainwright came from an RBI-double by David Ortiz, who is now hitting .733 in the series — the only Red Sox player in history with back-to-back 3-hit nights in the Fall Classic. Lester’s lone run came off a solo-shot homer to Matt Holliday — one of Lester’s only four hits allowed.

The Red Sox would get the better of Wainwright in the seventh, scoring two runs to make the score 3-2, Sox. And that’s how the game would end, as Koji Uehara was stellar once again, closing out the game for the Red Sox.

The Cardinals and Red Sox now head back to Boston. It will be interesting to see how each team plays, knowing game six could be it. The way this World Series has been going, however, — especially with Michael Wacha pitching game six for the Cardinals – I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see it go seven games. But, in the end, if I had to pick a favorite at this point in the series, I’d have to give the Red Sox the edge.

We’ll just have to wait and see what happens.

World Series Tied Heading Into St. Louis

Coming into the 2013 World Series the one thing everyone could agree upon, whether you’re rooting for the Cardinals or the Red Sox, was that this was going to be a great Fall Classic. Many people all around the baseball world expected a back and forth series, with several predicting a series of six or seven games. It would seem, if things keep up, that people’s predictions are going to come true.

But game one didn’t turn out to be the pitcher’s dual many envisioned.

dt_common_streams_StreamServerThe Cardinals’ Adam Wainwright went up against the Red Sox’ Jon Lester, in what was supposed to be a close game. But the Red Sox came out swinging. After loading the bases in the bottom of the first, Mike Napoli, who’s been heating up lately, cleared the bases on a double, making it a quick three-run Red Sox lead.

The Sox scored again in the second, off of timely hits. After that, however, neither team would score until the seventh, when David Ortiz – who had been robbed of a grand slam by Carlos Beltran, who was injured on the play, earlier in the game – blasted a home run into the bullpen, tacking on another two runs to extend the lead to seven runs, which would become an eight-run lead in the next inning.

Matt Holliday blasted a homer in the top of the ninth, but it didn’t do any good, as the Red Sox had too big of a lead and were able to take game one, 8-1.

The blowout left many people, myself included, scratching their heads and questioning whether this was going to be the series it had been hyped up to be. But doubts were eliminated in game two, as it brought the type of excitement everyone had been waiting for.

Michael Wacha was dominant yet again for the Cardinals, holding the Red Sox hitless through three innings. Jon Lackey was great as well for the Red Sox, but the Cards would strike first in this game, in the fourth, off of a Matt Holliday triple and a Yadier Molina RBI tapper over Untitledthe pitcher’s head. However, the Red Sox would answer back in the sixth, on a two-run home run from (who else?) David Ortiz, which ultimately knocked Wacha out of the game.

But it didn’t take long for the Cardinals to regain the lead, as in the seventh, after a walk to David Freese, a Jon Jay single, a double-steal, and a walk to Daniel Descalso, the bases became loaded for Matt Carpenter.

Carpenter hit a sacrifice fly left field, which tied the scored up at two runs. Moments later, on the same play, a high throw in an attempt to pick off Jay at third, gave the Cardinals a one-run lead. Then Carlos Beltran — who had been questionable to even play in this game due to an injury the night before — drove in Descalso, making it a 4-2 Cardinals lead, which is where the game would end.

The Red Sox and Cardinals now head to St. Louis tied at a game apiece. Either team has a chance to win the World Series Championship at Bush Stadium if they can sweep, however, with the talent both teams possess, odds are the winner will be crowned at Fenway Park sometime next week.

This could easily turn out to be a World Series for the history books.

Cardinals – Red Sox: World Series Predictions

One of the most difficult tasks every season is predicting which teams will do well enough throughout the year to earn a spot in the postseason. I had trouble myself predicting the teams from the start of the season that would make it, as I did poorly with my American League and National League predictions. But I’ve done really well so far with my postseason predictions. I had the Cardinals and Red Sox making the World Series and that’s exactly what happened.

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A rematch of the 2004 World Series, when the Red Sox swept the Cardinals in four games, this is sure to be one of the best Fall Classics in years. The Red Sox and the Cardinals are very evenly matched and are sure to put on amazing performances throughout the series, which begins on Wednesday night. Both have great pitching staffs, a great lineup and a great bullpen that includes a stellar closer. It will be interesting to watch everything unfold over the coming week or so.

The probable pitchers for games one through seven (five through seven only if necessary*) of the 2013 World Series are as follows:

Game 1: Adam Wainwright (Cardinals) - Jon Lester  (Red Sox)

Game 2: Michael Wacha (Cardinals) - Clay Buchholz (Red Sox)

Game 3: Joe Kelly (Cardinals) - John Lackey (Red Sox)

Game 4: Lance Lynn (Cardinals) - Jake Peavy (Red Sox) 

Game 5*: Adam Wainwright (Cardinals) - Jon Lester (Red Sox)

Game 6*: Michael Wacha (Cardinals) – Clay Buchholz (Red Sox)

Game 7*: Joe Kelly (Cardinals) - John Lackey (Red Sox)

Keep in mind that those could change, however, based on the way everything seems right now, I have the Cardinals winning the World Series in six games. Here’s the way I have things playing out, along with the reasoning to why I have each team winning each particular game:

My pick to win Game 1: Cardinals

Though the World Series is beginning in Boston, I have the Cardinals winning the first game. Adam Wainwright and Jon Lester are both great pitchers, but in the end I feel the Cardinals will get the better of Lester. This is likely to be the best game of the series, as neither teams wants to give up game one; often the pivotal game of the World Series.

My Pick to win Game 2: Cardinals

At just 22 years old, Michael Wacha has been pitching incredibly as of late. He’s going up against Clay Buchholz in game two, who began the season on a hot streak but has been hit or miss recently. I see Wacha once again pitching the Cardinals to a win, putting the Red Sox behind two games early on.

My pick to win Game 3: Red Sox

I’m predicting a bounce back game for the Red Sox, as although Joe Kelly has been great all year long, John Lackey will likely be a bit better. In addition, if in fact they’re down two games, I see the Red Sox putting on a hitting clinic to win game three. They certainly don’t want fall behind by three games in the World Series.

My pick to win Game 4: Red Sox

Once again pulling off a big win to even the series at two games apiece, the Red Sox are going to win game four in my mind. Jake Peavy is going up against Lance Lynn, and the Red Sox are likely to take their win from the night before into game four, where they’ll continue their streak to beat Lynn and the Cardinals.

My pick to win Game 5*: Cardinals

On the mound once again for the Cardinals will be Adam Wainwright, with Jon Lester going for the Sox. I have Wainwright pitching a gem of a game. The Cardinals will beat Lester and the Red Sox, on a great hitting and pitching performance, putting them a game over Boston, to push the series to 3-2.

My pick to win Game 6*: Cardinals

I feel Michael Wacha is going to pitch the best game of his career in game six. In my mind, this will be the final game of the World Series. Though the Red Sox are likely to put up a great fight, with amazing performances night after night, I feel the Cardinals will once again become World Series Champions. Unfortunately for them, in my mind, it will come in Boston.

Who do you have winning the World Series? In how many games? Let me know . . . .

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