Results tagged ‘ MVP ’

My Vote for National League Most Valuable Player

As I stated in my American League MVP blog post, choosing the Most Valuable Player from each league is the most difficult decision of all the major baseball awards handed out at the conclusion of each season. With Rookie of the Year and Cy Young you can look solely at which player had the better stats, however, Most Valuable Player involves a bit more than just stats. While it’s important that a MVP winner had a great statistical year, the best offensive player doesn’t automatically become the most valuable, in my opinion.

The way I view things, MVP has to come from a team that had a decent year, but that doesn’t necessarily mean their team had to make the playoffs. Contrary to what many believe, I feel the Most Valuable Player award needs to go to a player on a team that helped their ny_g_goldschmidt1x_sq_600team win the most, regardless of a postseason appearance. Remove them from the lineup and the team would be nowhere near the same.

Therefore, after considering the stats and going over a few other of my “requirements”, I narrowed down my top candidates for National League MVP to Freddie Freeman, Paul Goldschmidt, Andrew McCutchen and Yasiel Puig.

Every single one of those players had a great season, however, I feel McCutchen can quickly be knocked off the list. While he had a good year, McCutchen wasn’t the only reason the Pirates made the postseason for the first time in over twenty years. Other players on the team made a big impact as well. Last season McCutchen batted 10 points higher, blasted 10 more home runs and drove in 12 more runs than he did this year, yet the Pirates finished fourth in their division — further proving my point.

Of the three remaining candidates, in Goldschmidt, Freeman and Puig, as much as I feel Puig made an incredible impact, and initially had him as my vote up until a few days ago, I thought the better of picking him. But that’s not to knock what he did this season. Batting .319 with 19 homers and 42 RBI’s in 104 games, Puig came up in June and helped completely turn around a struggling Dodgers team, taking them from 7.5 games back of first upon his arrival, to winning their division by eleven games. The impact he made is vastly evident, but it wasn’t quite enough, when you take the time to really think about it.

In the end, I went with Paul Goldschmidt for National League Most Valuable Player, despite the fact that the Diamondback’s missed the playoffs.

Goldschmidt had an incredible year, leading all of the National League in home runs (36) and RBI’s (125), to go along with a batting average of .302. The D-back’s didn’t make the postseason, but Goldschmidt came up big in key spots all throughout the entire season to give his team a great chance to win. Therefore, when choosing between Freddie Freeman — even though the Braves made it past the regular season — and Paul Goldschmidt, I had to go with the D-back’s first baseman — the difficult but logical choice.

My Vote for American League Most Valuable Player

Choosing the Most Valuable Player from each league is the most difficult decision of all the major baseball awards handed out at the conclusion of each season. With Rookie of the Year and Cy Young, you can look solely at which player had the better stats, however, Most Valuable Player involves a bit more than just stats. While it’s important that a MVP winner had a great statistical year, the best offensive player doesn’t automatically become the most valuable, in my opinion.

As far as I view things, MVP has to come from a team that had a decent year, but that doesn’t necessarily mean their team had to make the playoffs. Contrary to what many believe, I feel the Most Valuable Player award needs to go to a player on a team that chrisdavis0504helped their team win the most, regardless of a postseason appearance. Remove them from the lineup and the team would be nowhere near the same.

Therefore, after considering the stats and going over a few other of my “requirements”, I narrowed down my top candidates for American League MVP to Mike Trout, Adrian Beltre, Chris Davis and Miguel Cabrera.

The shockers of those names are probably Beltre and Trout, but I feel they should at the very least be in the conversation. I acknowledge that they didn’t have seasons anywhere near that of Davis or Cabrera, but they had an impact on their respective teams nonetheless. However, although I wrote them in as considerations for the award, I didn’t go with either of them in the end.

After taking several days to think about who most deserves the award for Most Valuable Player, I had to go with Chris Davis.

Though not the popular choice, especially over Miguel Cabrera, Davis had an incredible year. And although the Orioles didn’t make the postseason, he was the Most Valuable Player from the American League as far as I’m concerned — providing the greatest impact of any American League player for their team on any given night.

Chris Davis set the Orioles’ single-season home run record, as well as extra base hits record, this past season, blasting 53 homers and recording 96 extra base knocks. In addition, Davis drove in 138 runs to go along with a .286 batting average, and ultimately gave the Orioles a chance to win every single game, no matter who they were facing. He was an extremely valuable piece to their puzzle.

His competition, Miguel Cabrera, had another incredible year, batting .348 with 44 homers and 137 RBI’s. Had Cabrera been able to stay healthy throughout the entire season, subsequently giving him slightly better stats, he would probably be my choice for MVP. But while he had another Triple Crown worthy year — just getting beat out by Davis in HR’s and RBI’s — and played for a team that made the playoffs, he wasn’t the most valuable player from the American League.

That accolade goes to Chris Davis.

Blogging Schedule for the Rest of the Year

The 2013 MLB regular season is almost over, and that means it’s just about time for postseason baseball.

I — along with many other baseball fans around the country — love this time of year.

But while no one can predict for sure which teams will thrive in the playoffs and inevitably go onto win the World Series, there’s no need to predict what’s to come from me, as I wanted to go ahead and discuss my basic blogging plan for the remainder of 2013; just so you have an idea of what to expect.

Coming up on Monday, I’m planning to write up my postseason predictions. After that, once game 163 of the season is played, I’m going to be posting my final latest leaders entry — something I’ve been doing on the first day of each month since May, with the exception of August. My votes for the three major awards of Cy Young, Most Valuable Player and Rookie of the Year coming at some point thereafter, at no specific time.

Whenever there’s a gap in postseason action, I suppose, is when I’ll do those.

Then, after the 2013 champions have been crowned, and everything begins to calm down a bit, I’ll begin conducting my offseason interviews with Minor League prospects, as well as some Major Leaguers; and, possibly, this year, a Hall of Famer or two. There’s no lock on that yet, so I won’t name any names. But it’s looking quite promising. (The interviews will run every week or two from November to March.)

Other than that, I have no idea.

I’m bound to blog about other news, but this is just a general outline of my plans for the next several months. Things will probably end up changing a bit anyway, so stay tuned . . . .

Davis Launches 51st Homer, Makes Orioles’ History

Chris Davis blasted his 51st home run of the season off of Ryan Dempster during Tuesday night’s game against the Red Sox, making him the new Orioles’ record holder for most homers in a single season; breaking the old record of 50, posted by Brady Anderson in 1996.

With that game-tying, solo-shot home run, Davis also tied Anderson’s franchise record for extra-base hits in a year with 92 — both Davis’ HR and extra-base numbers lead the Majors, to go along with a .293 batting average — and joins Babe Ruth and Albert Belle as the only players in MLB history with 50 home runs and 40 doubles in a season.

Needless to say, Davis is having an incredible year.

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And he’s not alone.

In addition to Davis, the Orioles have their young phenom, Manny Machado, — currently tied for most doubles this season with 51 — playing tremendously, as well as Adam Jones, who is having another great season. Combine it all together, and you have a very potent lineup.

But despite the great team the Orioles have, they’re still fighting to make the playoffs, as they currently sit two games back of the second Wild Card spot, held by the Rangers, with just twelve games remaining.

Part of that has to do with the Orioles’ pitching, which hasn’t been extremely great all season long. For me, if they miss the playoffs it’s going to be because of their pitching staff.

Therefore, while not impossible, it’s going to take a lot of production, and a bit of luck, from everyone on the squad. Davis is certainly giving it his best shot, as he shows no signs of slowing down any time soon.

That’s bad news if you’re Miguel Cabrera — or if you’re just rooting for him. Although he leads the Majors in batting average and RBI’s — just one more RBI than Davis — Davis is leading Cabrera by eight home runs. With so few games left, it’s going to take a power surge from Cabrera, and a power outage from Davis, for things to work out — not likely to happen.

But while you’re probably not going to witness history, in Cabrera becoming the first player to ever win back-to-back Triple Crown awards, you’re getting the privilege of seeing one of the game’s best sluggers put on an amazing performance.

No matter the outcome of the season, 2013 will go down as a memorable year for Chris Davis and the Orioles. A year which included an exciting playoff chase, as well as one that could end with Davis receiving a major award: The American League M.V.P.

Frontrunners For MLB Awards At the All-Star Break

The final MLB games until after the All-Star break were played on Sunday, and although the baseball world is buzzing about Yoenis Cespedes winning the 2013 Home Run Derby, with it being half way through the season, I figured I’d post a blog entry not on the derby, but on the players who I feel stand the best chance, as of right now, to win the three major awards of Most Valuable Player, Rookie of the Year and Cy Young. All three awards have several players who could be argued are worthy, but I have my own opinion as to who deserves each award the most.

Most Valuable Player Award

BS sp-orioles-twins-p30 lamAmerican League: It’s a two-man race for who deserves the MVP award for the American League. Both Chris Davis and Miguel Cabrera have already posted numbers that would be a great full year for many players, and there’s still nearly three more months left until the end of the season. But I’m going to have to go with Chris Davis, as of right now. Davis has been one of the best players in all of baseball for the past year, and if he can keep up the pace, should be the AL MVP.

National League: It’s a little more of a challenge to pick one player for who will inevitably win the National League MVP, assuming they keep on playing the way they have been. With guys like Yadier Molina, Michael Cuddyer and Buster Posey in the running, it’s not a very obvious choice. I’m going to go with Michael Cuddyer, though. While Posey and Molina are having great years, Cuddyer is making a bigger individual impact on whether or not his team wins than anyone else in the NL.

Rookie of the Year Award

Wil+Myers+Tampa+Bay+Rays+v+Boston+Red+Sox+vTHBR4fXaxixAmerican League: This was the easiest of all of the categories, for me. There’s no doubt in my mind that Wil Myers deserves the American League Rookie of the Year award. Altough I gave a bit of consideration to both Nick Franklin and David Lough, I just feel that Myers is going to have an even better second half to the season than any rookie in baseball. If he can play to his full potential, he should be able to blow away all of the other competition.

National League: It came down to Yasiel Puig, Matt Adams, Jedd Gyorko, Evan Gattis and Marcel Ozuna, for the player I felt most deserved the National League Rookie of the Year award, as of right now. All of them have been having fantastic seasons, and while they should continue to have great years, I had to go with Matt Adams. I still like Puig, and feel he will be a super star for years to come, but Adams deserves the award, in my opinion. The way he’s been contributing is truly incredible.

Cy Young Award

Clayton+Kershaw+Los+Angeles+Dodgers+v+St+Louis+tphRSOeazpAxAmerican League: When you have to pick between Felix Hernandez, Bartolo Colon and Max Scherzer, for American League Cy Young, it’s not an easy choice. All have been having great seasons, and you can make an argument for and against each player. But after going back and forth between them, I ended up going with Max Scherzer. While it would appear an easy decision, with Scherzer’s record of 13-1, it wasn’t. Eight AL pitchers have a better ERA, but when you combine everything, I still have Scherzer for the Cy Young.

National League: I had several different pitchers on my list of players deserving of the National League Cy Young award, including guys like Matt Harvey, Jeff Locke, Adam Wainwright, Patrick Corbin, Jordan Zimmermann and Madison Bumgarner, but I didn’t go with any of them. I ended up going with Clayton Kershaw. While I’m a huge fan of Harvey, and could’ve easily picked him, Kershaw is having the overall better year, and that’s why I have him winning the award.

But there’s still plenty of time left in the season, and anything can happen.

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With all of that said, this will be my last blog post for a good bit of time.

I’m going on a 24-day road trip around the country, starting Wednesday, and won’t have the time to put in the effort necessary to keep up this blog. Though I hate breaking one of my original goals of blogging at least once every four days, it can’t be helped; but I’m still on pace for my goal of 100 posts for the year. At least I’m incorporating baseball into the trip, among numerous other things, as I’ll be attending the Mariners game in Seattle, on July 26th, versus the Twins. So that should be fun. (I haven’t decided yet if I’ll be blogging about the game.)

Therefore, this is all for awhile. I’ll be back in a month.

Cabrera and Posey Win Most Valuable Player Award

I was extremely surprised with this year’s MVP voting. Not just with the winners of the award from the American League and National League, but also with the blowout fashion in which they won. I don’t feel it should’ve been such a major difference between first and second place in each league, but it is what it is.

In the end, it was Miguel Cabrera taking home the MVP award for the American League, with Buster Posey receiving the MVP award for the National Leauge; as voted on by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America (BBWAA).

This was both Miguel Cabrera’s and Buster Posey’s first Most Valuable Player award.

AMERICAN LEAGUE MOST VALUABLE PLAYER: MIGUEL CABRERA

Original Pick: Mike Trout

Pick after finalists were revealed: Mike Trout

Thoughts On Miguel Cabrera Winning

I can’t believe how much of a landslide the vote for American League Most Valuable Player was. Although I was pulling for Mike Trout, I pretty much expected Miguel Cabrera to win. But to receive 22 of the 28 first place votes is absolutely ridiculous. Even if you think Cabrera was the more valuable player, you can’t honestly tell me that he was THAT much more valuable than Trout. It’s just not true.

So really, I’m not as upset about Miguel Cabrera winning the MVP award as much as I’m upset at how much of a blowout it was. In total, Cabrera beat out Trout by 81 points.

Truly incredible for an award that was supposedly going to be close.

The main reason Cabrera won the MVP award is the fact that he won the Triple Crown–posting a .330 average with 44 homeruns and 139 RBI’s.

While it’s amazing that he was able to accomplish something that hasn’t been done since 1967, I find it necessary to point out that Trout was able to accomplish things no player in the history of baseball has EVER been able to do. Besides, when it comes down to it, just because you posted better stats doesn’t mean you were the more valuable player to your team–which is what the award is all about.

So, while the Triple Crown is an amazing accomplishment for Cabrera, it’s not something you should base your vote on, in my opinion. Especially when Trout was able to one up Cabrera as far as historical occurences go.

Moving on to the second key aspect of Cabrera’s MVP win, I feel the voters’ pushed Trout out of the picture for the sole reason that he and his Angels didn’t make it to the playoffs, while Cabrera and the Tigers made it all the way to the World Series. I truly don’t understand why you would even consider using that as a reason for picking the most valuable player.

If you look at the facts, Cabrera’s Tigers actually had a worse record than the Angels. The reason they made it to the playoffs, while the Angels fell short, is because they played in an easier division. Should Trout be penalized because he played in the difficult AL West, and wasn’t able lead his team to the playoffs? Absolutely not. Making it to the playoffs takes a team effort; Trout could only do so much.

He was still extremely valuable to his team, even though it didn’t result in a playoff run.

So, while Miguel Cabrera received the award, and will go down in the record books as the 2012 AL MVP, when I look back on this season decades from now I’ll always find myself thinking about what should’ve been.

The BBWAA’s vote had Mike Trout finishing second, with Adrian Beltre coming in third.

NATIONAL LEAGUE MOST VALUABLE PLAYER: BUSTER POSEY

Original Pick: Ryan Braun

Pick after finalists were revealed: Ryan Braun

Thoughts On Buster Posey Winning

While I don’t feel as strongly about the National League portion of the MVP award as I do about the American League side, I still think Ryan Braun should’ve won the award; but at the same time, I’m not upset that Buster Posey won.

What it comes down to for me is what the voters’ (once again) decided to base their decision on. I feel like just as with the AL award, the National League MVP didn’t go to the “most valuable” player, but rather the player that was on the more successful team.

Just because Braun’s Brewers didn’t make the playoffs, he was pretty much pushed aside by the voters’ who historically love to see players from playoff teams win the award. (Since 1995, only 6 MVP winners have come from teams that didn’t make the post season.)

So I feel Braun wasn’t given a fair chance in that regard.

The only real complaint I have with the National League MVP award is the fact that Posey beat out Braun by an astounding 137 points. I don’t feel the voting results truly show how close it really was statistically between Braun and Posey. Yet another example of how much stock the BBWAA takes in whether or not a player’s team made the playoffs.

I’m really getting tired of it.

The BBWAA’s vote had Ryan Braun finishing second, with Andrew McCutchen coming in third.

2012 BBWAA ROY, Cy Young and MVP Award Finalists

The Baseball Writers’ Association of America (BBWAA) award finalists for 2012 Rookie of the Year, Cy Young and MVP were announced Wednesday night on MLB Network. For the most part I agree with the finalists, but there are a few I’m surprised about, so I thought I’d take the time to share my thoughts, starting with Rookie of the Year:

ROOKIE OF THE YEAR

American League: Yoenis Cespedes, Yu Darvish and Mike Trout.

There’s really no contest when it comes to American League Rookie of the Year. If your last name isn’t Trout, you don’t stand a chance. While both Cespedes and Darvish had great rookie seasons, neither came close to the year that Mike Trout had. Posting a .326 batting average with 30 home runs and 83 RBI’s, Trout led all AL rookies in every conceivable category. So, unless they change the voting procedure and decide to draw the winners’ name out of a hat, Mike Trout will be the recipient of the award.

National League: Todd Frazier, Bryce Harper and Wade Miley.

As far as National League Rookie of the Year goes, it’s a bit more of a challenge to make a selection–especially when your original pick isn’t one of the finalists. I still feel that Wilin Rosario (my original pick for the award) should at least be in the final three, but alas he’s nowhere to be found. I knew it was a long shot for Rosario to win, but to not be a finalist is a real shame in my opinion. But anyway, looking at the players that did make the final list, I would have to say that Bryce Harper stands the best chance of winning the award by popularity alone. Having been in the spotlight for so long, that’ll probably be just enough to put him over the top with the voters.

CY YOUNG

American League: David Price, Justin Verlander and Jered Weaver.

A lot of people feel that Fernando Rodney should be one of the finalists for American League Cy Young, but personally I’m glad he isn’t. I don’t like the idea of a non-starter winning the award; even if Rodney did have an ERA of 0.60. Of the finalists, I still side with my original pick of Jered Weaver, but I have a feeling it’s going to be David Price that wins the award, though to be honest, I wouldn’t be shocked or disappointed with any of the three winning. They’re all worthy.

National League: R.A. Dickey, Gio Gonzalez and Clayton Kershaw.

As with the AL, many feel that closers Aroldis Chapman and/or Craig Kimbrel should be finalists for National League Cy Young. You already know how I feel about closers winning the award, so I’ll move on to picking between the three remaining pitchers. My original pick of Clayton Kershaw is one of the finalists, but I don’t feel very confident that he’ll win. I think it’ll go to Dickey or Gonzalez, but as with American League, I wouldn’t be upset with any of them taking home the award.

MOST VALUABLE PLAYER

American League: Adrian Beltre, Miguel Cabrera, Robinson Cano, Josh Hamilton and Mike Trout.

As far as the American League portion goes, you can go ahead and eliminate Beltre, Cano and Hamilton. They all had great years, but it’s going to come down to Miguel Cabrera and Mike Trout. As I’ve stated many times, I feel strongly that Trout should win the award. He exemplified just what it means to be the Most Valuable player to your given team, which is what the award is all about. So, while many feel Cabrera should win the MVP–mainly because he was the first player in 45 years to win the Triple Crown–I’m still sticking with my original pick of Mike Trout.

National League: Ryan Braun, Chase Headley, Andrew McCutchen, Yadier Molina and Buster Posey.

My opinion of who should win the National League MVP isn’t quite as strong as with the AL portion, but I still feel that Ryan Braun should win the award over Buster Posey. One of the reasons people are leaning towards Posey over Braun is that Posey and the Giants won the World Series while Braun and the Brewers didn’t even make the playoffs, but that’s not really a fair thing to base your vote on. MVP is an individual award for the player who most impacted their team, and in my opinion that was Ryan Braun.

The winner of each award will be announced next week on MLB Network.

Here’s the schedule:

AL & NL Rookie of the Year : Monday, November 12th

AL & NL Cy Young: Wednesday, November 14th

AL & NL Most Valuable Player: Thursday, November 15th

As stated in a previous blog post, I plan on posting a recap of the winner–along with a look at how well I did with my predictions–in a blog entry following the day each award is announced. So be sure to check back for that…..

Finally Back Up and Running

Question: What do you get when you combine a shattered computer screen with an internet connection problem?

Answer: A two week gap in blog posts–which is the case here.

Unfortunately, since I wasn’t able to hop on my laptop and type up a blog entry over the past couple of weeks, I missed out on writing about the World Series like I had been planning to. In addition, I was unable to post entries on the Gold Glove awards, as well as the Player’s Choice awards, but although I missed out on those, I’m still planning to post something on the Silver Slugger awards, which are set to be announced Thursday night.

After that will come posts on the 2012 Rookie of the Year, Cy Young and MVP award winners. They will be published the day after each is announced and will include a recap of the winner along with a look at how well I did with my predictions (probably not all that well).

Following the award winners blog posts–which will run through the end of next week–I’m just planning to post my thoughts on the latest MLB news as it happens. That’ll be the case for most of the offseason, but I might change it up here and there; I haven’t decided yet. One thing I am going to attempt to do is post an offseason Q and A with a MiLB or MLB player once every two weeks starting after next weeks’ awards posts. I should be able to pull it off, but it really comes down to player cooperation.

So, as of right now, that’s the plan for the offseason. Keep in mind, however, that a lot can happen between now and the beginning of the 2013 MLB season, so make sure to check back often. I’ll be sure to let you know if my plans change….

My Vote for National League M.V.P.

This is the first of four blog posts I plan to publish over the coming days; all of which will focus on who I feel should win the three major awards of Most Valuable Player (MVP), Cy Young and Rookie of the Year (ROY).

If you missed the post on who I feel should win AL MVP, go ahead and check that out now. If you’ve already read it, then you know the guidlines I tend to follow when making a vote for MVP:

I’m not all that influenced by stats, and I especially don’t lean towards a player just because their team made it to the playoffs and another player’s team didn’t. I’ve always chosen to look at it by which player had the greatest positive impact on their team, and I’m not about to change things.

As I stated in a previous blog entry, I don’t want you to think of these as predictions, but rather as cases for which player I feel deserves each award. The player I feel most deserves a specific award isn’t necessarily the player I think will win it. (Keep that in mind as you’re reading.)

Andrew McCutchen

If MVP voting took place during the All-Star break Andrew McCutchen would have my vote, hands down. McCutchen was a big reason the Pirates were 11 games over .500 and atop the NL Central at the time. With McCutchen leading the way, it appeared that the Pirates were well on their way to the teams first .500+ season since 1992–but things didn’t go as planned for McCutchen and the Bucco’s.

In the games following the Midsummer Classic, the Pirates did nothing but tumble; with McCutchen sharing in the same fate. Losing a spot in the standings each month following July, the Pirates finished the year 18 games back of first place in their division (good enough for 4th); with McCutchen’s batting average falling from .362 to .327 over that time span.

Though McCutchen batted .327 on the year, with 31 home runs and 96 RBI’s, he couldn’t keep up the pace throughout the entire season, which is very key in my book when it comes to making a selection for MVP. When a team relies on a player as much as the Pirates relied on McCutchen, that player has to be able to step up all season long to ensure that the team succeeds. Unfortunately, McCutchen wasn’t able to pull if off.

Thus, McCutchen isn’t my pick for MVP…

Buster Posey

When Melky Cabrera was suspended in August for his PED use, the Giants’ needed someone to step up and start impacting the team in a major way, should they have a hope at keeping up with the sizzling Dodgers; who were one game ahead in the division standings at the time. That person would end up being Buster Posey….Brandon Belt…Pablo Sandoval…and pretty much 75 percent of the team. But wait….that’s more than one person. I know. (That’s exactly my point.)

Buster Posey put up incredible stats this season, batting .336 on the year, with 24 home runs and 103 RBI’s, but he didn’t single-handedly put the Giants in the postseason; which is what I’ve been hearing a lot of lately. While Posey certainly played a major role in the Giants’ run to the playoffs, he wasn’t the only one coming up big night, after night, after night. There were several other guys that made major contributions as well.

That’s one of the main reasons I feel voting for MVP based on whether or not a player’s team made the playoffs is crazy. Nearly 100 percent of the time, a player didn’t push his team into the playoffs without some help from his teamates along the way.

So, although Posey had a stellar year, he didn’t quite make my cut…

My Vote for M.V.P.

My vote for Most Valuable Player of the National League goes to Ryan Braun.

While he didn’t ‘lead his team to the playoffs’, no player in the National League had the impact that Braun had on the Brewers. Without Braun, the Brewers don’t finish out the season as strongly as they did. Which is one of the key reasons he’s my pick for MVP.

Braun was ‘that guy’ for the Brewers all season long, and he didn’t let up when September rolled around, even though it appeared the Brewers were out of contention; if anything, Braun got even better. That’s the kind of player Braun is. He impacts his team day in and day out, even when it would be easy to hang it up.

Something I’ve been hearing a lot of lately is that Braun won’t win the MVP award due to his 2011 Performance Enhancing Drug (PED) accusation. Even though Braun was found not guilty, some are still holding it against him. My response to that being: Get over it.

By putting up even better numbers than last year, Braun has proven to the world that he doesn’t need banned substances to make him a beast; he’s a beast by nature. Though his batting average fell 13 points from last year, Braun smacked 8 more home runs–and for good measure, an extra RBI–than he did in 2011. While I don’t hold too much stock in stats, that really jumps out at me.

It’s incredible what Braun was able to do all season long to help out his team. He had the greatest impact of any other player in the NL, and doing so earns him my pick for 2012 National League MVP.

My Blogging Plans for Next Week

If you’ve been following this blog for awhile you know that every now and then I like to post an entry detailing my blogging plans for the next week or so. It’s just something I like to do to give you (the reader) a general idea of what’s to come.

All of next week I’m going to be posting blog entries on which players I feel deserve the three major awards of Most Valuable Player (MVP), Cy Young and Rookie of the Year (ROY). I’ll be giving my take on both the American League and National League, and as of right now, the plan is as follows:

Tuesday, October 9th: National League Most Valuable Player

Wednesday, October 10th: American League Cy Young

Thursday, October 11th: National League Cy Young

Friday, October 12th: American and National League Rookie of the Year

While the blog posts are going to be about which player I feel deserves each award, I don’t want you to think of them as predictions. Just because I think a particular player deserves an award doesn’t necessarily mean that’s who I think will win it–as was the case with my post on American League M.V.P.

Now, you may be wondering why I’m taking the time to blog about awards, that won’t be voted on until November, during a time when the playoffs are beginning to heat up. It’s really quite simple: I can’t blog about EVERY game that’s taking place at the moment–that would take too much time and effort–and closer to voting time the World Series will be taking place (which I fully plan to blog about, just as I did last year). So in reality, this is the only shot I have at fitting it in.

If anything MAJOR happens in the playoffs between now and Friday I’ll be sure to blog about it, but odds are that while there will definitely be some dramatic moments, nothing extremly blog worthy will occur.

So, unless something unexpected happens, get ready for a busy week of blog posts.

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