Results tagged ‘ Rangers ’

My Vote for American League Cy Young

Each season there are usually several pitchers from each league that have incredible seasons, making it difficult to choose between them for who most deserves the Cy Young award. This year, however, it really wasn’t all that close. Bartolo Colon, Hisashi Iwakuma, Anibal Sanchez, Yu Darvish and Max Scherzer all had great years, but only one of them truly stood above the rest. Regardless, I’ll take the time to go over all of the top candidates anyway.

Bartolo Colon had a great season, going 18-6 with a 2.65 ERA, however, he didn’t have nearly good enough of a year to win the Cy Young. His opponent batting average was .264 — fairly bad — and that, combined with a few other stats that just weren’t the best, leave him shimg23755956ort of the credentials needed to win. But having the year he had at the age of 40 is impressive in itself.

Hasashi Iwakuma recorded a mere 14 wins throughout the season, but that’s not the only reason I didn’t pick him. Iwakuma’s 2.66 ERA and .220 batting average against was pretty good, but he didn’t do enough to come close to winning the award. If, however, he can pitch the same, or better, next season as he did this year, Iwakuma stands a chance of receiving the Cy Young down the road.

Anibal Sanchez is one of two Tigers pitchers on my list, and had Verlander pitched throughout the season the way he’s been pitching in the postseason, there would probably be three. Regardless, Sanchez had a career-best season, where he went 14-8 with a 2.57 ERA. As with Iwakuma, a few more wins would’ve made the Cy Young race a bit more interesting.

Yu Darvish was the second best American League pitcher this season, in my opinion. If he could’ve performed the entire season the way he began the year, he would’ve had a good shot at winning. By going 13-9 with a 2.83 ERA, MLB-leading 277 strikeout’s, and .194 opponent batting average, Darvish put together a very good season. But not quite good enough.

That just leaves Max Scherzer, who is the favorite to win the American League Cy Young award.

Scherzer led all pitchers in wins this season with 21 — the only pitcher in baseball to record 20 or more wins — ,going 21-3 on the year. Posting an ERA of 2.90 and a mere .198 batting average against, Scherzer had a Cy Young worthy year. A year that helped lead his team to the postseason, and will likely lead him to his first career Cy Young award.

My Vote for American League Most Valuable Player

Choosing the Most Valuable Player from each league is the most difficult decision of all the major baseball awards handed out at the conclusion of each season. With Rookie of the Year and Cy Young, you can look solely at which player had the better stats, however, Most Valuable Player involves a bit more than just stats. While it’s important that a MVP winner had a great statistical year, the best offensive player doesn’t automatically become the most valuable, in my opinion.

As far as I view things, MVP has to come from a team that had a decent year, but that doesn’t necessarily mean their team had to make the playoffs. Contrary to what many believe, I feel the Most Valuable Player award needs to go to a player on a team that chrisdavis0504helped their team win the most, regardless of a postseason appearance. Remove them from the lineup and the team would be nowhere near the same.

Therefore, after considering the stats and going over a few other of my “requirements”, I narrowed down my top candidates for American League MVP to Mike Trout, Adrian Beltre, Chris Davis and Miguel Cabrera.

The shockers of those names are probably Beltre and Trout, but I feel they should at the very least be in the conversation. I acknowledge that they didn’t have seasons anywhere near that of Davis or Cabrera, but they had an impact on their respective teams nonetheless. However, although I wrote them in as considerations for the award, I didn’t go with either of them in the end.

After taking several days to think about who most deserves the award for Most Valuable Player, I had to go with Chris Davis.

Though not the popular choice, especially over Miguel Cabrera, Davis had an incredible year. And although the Orioles didn’t make the postseason, he was the Most Valuable Player from the American League as far as I’m concerned — providing the greatest impact of any American League player for their team on any given night.

Chris Davis set the Orioles’ single-season home run record, as well as extra base hits record, this past season, blasting 53 homers and recording 96 extra base knocks. In addition, Davis drove in 138 runs to go along with a .286 batting average, and ultimately gave the Orioles a chance to win every single game, no matter who they were facing. He was an extremely valuable piece to their puzzle.

His competition, Miguel Cabrera, had another incredible year, batting .348 with 44 homers and 137 RBI’s. Had Cabrera been able to stay healthy throughout the entire season, subsequently giving him slightly better stats, he would probably be my choice for MVP. But while he had another Triple Crown worthy year — just getting beat out by Davis in HR’s and RBI’s — and played for a team that made the playoffs, he wasn’t the most valuable player from the American League.

That accolade goes to Chris Davis.

My 2013 MLB Postseason Predictions

I was originally planning on waiting to type up my postseason predictions until after the Wild Card games had been played, as with them being a mere one game a wrong pick could easily throw off the remainder of the predictions. But it was brought to my attention that doing so wouldn’t make them true playoff predictions, which I suppose is true. I wouldn’t want to do that.

The following are my picks for which teams are going to do well in the postseason and subsequently go onto win the World Series. I doubt you’ll agree with a lot of them, however, it’s just the way I see it. You never know what might happen.

WILD CARD GAMES

American League: Rays Vs. Indians

Winner: Indians

I have the Indians beating out the Rays in Wednesday night’s game. While the Rays have a great team, their pitching staff hasn’t been the best this year, although they do have Alex Cobb on the mound. The Indians’ are just as good as the Rays, however, and combining that with the momentum of winning so many games in a row to finish out the year will be more than enough for the Indians to overtake the Rays.

National League: Pirates Vs. Reds

Winner: Pirates

Both the Reds and Pirates have great teams, however, I feel the Pirates are starting a better pitcher than the Reds, in Francisco Liriano, who’s been great all year. I also see the Pirates as having a more consistent group of players that will come together to get the job done. Therefore, while the Reds have had a great year, I don’t see them making it past this game.

AMERICAN LEAGUE DIVISION SERIES

Indians Vs. Red Sox

Winner: Red Sox

Even though I have the Indians beating out the Rays to move on to the ALDS, I don’t think their momentum alone will be enough to carry them past the incredible Red Sox team. The Red Sox’ pitching staff, and especially their lineup, is too much for the Indians to compete with, in my opinion.

Athletics Vs. Tigers

Winner: Tigers

For the second straight season, the Athletics had a fantastic year, but I don’t think it will continue past the first round of the playoffs. The Tigers have a great pitching staff, as well as numerous threats up and down their lineup that I think will be enough to beat the A’s. No matter what happens, this is sure to be a great series.

NATIONAL LEAGUE DIVISION SERIES

Cardinals Vs. Pirates

Winner: Cardinals

The Pirates have been a great story all season long, however, I don’t see them as having a good enough overall team to overthrow the Cardinals. The Cards have a great pitching staff, consisting of a lot of young stars, and though it’ll be close, I have the Cardinals moving on to the Championship Series.

Braves Vs. Dodgers

Winner: Braves

With a pitching staff that includes Clayton Kershaw, and a lineup that includes Yasiel Puig and Hanley Ramirez, you’d think the Dodgers would be able to run over any team that gets in their way. But I don’t see them getting past the Braves, who have a great team that has consistently fought back all season long. That unwillingness to give up will be what helps them move past the Dodgers, in my mind.

AMERICAN LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

Tigers Vs. Red Sox

Winner: Red Sox

Likely to be the best series of the entire postseason, the Red Sox and Tigers are very evenly matched. But having to pick one, I’m going with the Red Sox, as they have amazed everyone all year long and will continue to do amazing things, in my mind. They should have just enough to move on.

NATIONAL LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

Cardinals Vs. Braves

Winner: Cardinals

The Cardinals and Braves both have a nice mix of good pitching and a great lineup, but although it might take the entire seven game series to decide, I feel the Cardinals are the better team and will ultimately come out victorious. They should be able to move onto the World Series in the end.

WORLD SERIES

Red Sox Vs. Cardinals

Winner: Cardinals

I feel this is going to be one of the best World Series in years, should the Cardinals and Red Sox make it there as I’m predicting. Both are incredibly great teams that come up big when their backs are against the wall. I see them both having great World Series performances, with the Cardinals just edging out the Red Sox for the 2013 World Series Championship.

Leave a comment with who you have winning the World Series. I’d love to hear your picks.

Final Games of the 2013 MLB Regular Season

Every new season brings new hope among all thirty teams around Major League Baseball. No matter how badly you did the year before, there’s always a chance that any given season could be your year. However, the yearly aspiration of postseason baseball ended for nineteen teams on Sunday afternoon — leaving just the Red Sox, Tigers, Athletics, Indians, Rays, Rangers, Braves, Cardinals, Dodgers, Pirates and Reds with shots at winning it all.

But it’s not going to be an easy road for any of them.

The Rays and Rangers face arguably the most difficult path, as they ended the season tied for the second American League Wild Card spot, and therefore will have to play in a one-game tiebreaker game Monday night in Arlington — game 163 of the season. It’s do or die for both teams, as a win could mean playoff glory, with a loss meaning the end of the season.

It’s sure to be an incredibly great game.

While eleven teams are still battling it out for a shot at becoming World Series Champions, the remainder of the teams are done for the year. But some players on those teams are finished forever, as they announced their retirement earlier in the season.

7Mariano Rivera and Todd Helton are two of the biggest names of the retirees, and both have good cases for the Hall of Fame, once their first year of eligibility rolls around in 2019.

Rivera — the greatest closer in MLB history — is the definition of greatness, both on and off the field. Rivera will go down as one of the best players and people the game has ever seen, and will undoubtedly be missed by everyone around the baseball world.

Another player of equal caliber is Todd Helton, who made a name for himself as arguably the best player in Rockies history, as well as a player who is well respected all around the game.

It will be interesting to see how both the Yankees and Rockies — teams that had subpar years — will do next year without their long-time star players.

In the end, no matter what next year brings, it’s extremely sad to see them go.

But Sunday wasn’t completely full of sadness.

Henderson Alvarez, of the Miami Marlins, threw the fifth no hitter in franchise history, however, it wasn’t done in the most conventional way; part of what makes it so intriguing. Alvarez recorded the twenty-seventh out of the game in the ninth, without having allowed any hits, but it wasn’t officially a no-no just yet. The Marlins gave Alvarez absolutely no run support, and it took a bases loaded, wild pitch in the bottom of the ninth to secure both the Marlins win and, more importantly, Alvarez’s no hitter.

Truly a remarkable way to end the year.

If the 2013 postseason winds up providing anywhere close to the level of excitement the last day of the 2013 regular season brought, it’s sure to be an amazing month of October.

My final latest leaders blog post, which I was planning to post tomorrow, will have to be moved to Tuesday, as game 163 of the year is being played tomorrow night between the Rangers and Rays, with the stats counting towards the regular season stats. After that, my postseason predictions will be posted on Thursday as scheduled. Be sure to check back to see who I have making it to the World Series. (My World Series predictions will come after the two teams have been decided a few weeks down the road.)

Fastest & Slowest Starts to the 2013 MLB Season

We’re just over a week into the 2013 MLB regular season, and I wanted to post a blog, just like last year, on the fastest and slowest starts to the season for both entire teams and individual players. While it’s a small sample size, the list gives you an idea of what’s been taking place so far this season. Some of the players and teams are performing nearly as well as expected, but others are putting on performances that I never would’ve predicted them to begin the season with.

FASTEST STARTS TO THE SEASON

Teams:

1) Braves (6-1)

2) Diamondbacks (5-2)

3) Rockies (5-2)

4) Red Sox (5-2)

5) Athletics (5-2)

6) Rangers (5-2)

7) Reds (5-2)

8) Mets (5-2)

The Braves currently lead all of baseball with a win percentage of .857. Justin Upton has been making a major impact, hitting six home runs in the first seven games, and I fully expected the Braves to have a season long performance like the one they’re currently starting out with. The Diamondbacks, Rockies, Red Sox and Mets are all surprising me, so far, as I expected them to all have poor seasons, and while it’s still very early, at the moment, they’re making things interesting. As far as the Athletics, Rangers and Reds go, it’s not a shock that they’re doing so well. Though I thought the Rangers would have a bit of a struggle this season, without Josh Hamilton, they seem to be doing just fine. It should be interesting to see if they can keep it up.

Players:

1) Adam Jones (.500)

2) Jed Lowrie (.500)

3) Carlos Santana (.500)

4) Michael Cuddyer (.478)

5) Carl Crawford (.450)

6) Jean Segura (.450)

*Minimum of 20 AB’s

Adam Jones is the only player on the list of fastest start players that I’m not surprised with. Having recorded a 32 homer, 82 RBI season, in 2012, Jones is in the prime of his career, and is set to have another fantastic season. For Jed Lowrie, Carlos Santana, Michael Cuddyer, Carl Crawford and Jean Segura, they better enjoy the hot start while it lasts, because I don’t see any of them having an all that spectacular year. But as with anything in baseball, there’s always the chance for me to be proven wrong.

SLOWEST STARTS TO THE SEASON

Teams:

1) Astros (1-6)

2) Marlins (1-6)

3) Padres (1-5)

4) Pirates (2-5)

5) Brewers (2-5)

6) Phillies (2-5)

7) Cubs (2-5)

After beating the Rangers, 8-2, on Opening Night, the Astros have done nothing but go down hill, ever since. With 155 games left to play, and just 94 losses away from 100, it’s likely the Astros’ season will end with yet another year of 100+ losses. The Marlins, Padres and Pirates are all teams that have the potential to win now, but it’s likely to be a year or two before they start to become big time contenders in their divisions. The Brewers and Phillies are the only teams that surprise me, somewhat, on this list, but they just haven’t performed well so far this year. And as for the Cubs, they’re just being themselves; destined to make it 105 seasons without a World Series title.

Players:

1) Jeff Keppinger (.048)

2) Ryan Hanigan (.050)

3) Aaron Hicks (.067)

4) Pedro Alvarez (.080)

5) Neil Walker (.083)

*Minimum of 20 AB’s

No one on this list surprises me, other than Neil Walker. Walker is arguably the best player on the list, but he hasn’t been able to find his groove so far this season. I look for him to get things going, however, and record another season like he has the past few years–10-15 homers and 65-80 RBI’s, with a high 200’s batting average. For Jeff Keppinger, Ryan Hanigan, Aaron Hicks and Pedro Alvarez, it will be interesting to see if they get their acts together, or if this is a sign of things to come for them this season, as things can certainly only go up.

Keep in mind, while those are the players and teams with the fastest and slowest starts to the season, there’s still a lot of baseball left to be played, and anything can happen. Only time will tell if the current trends will last; that’s why they play 162 games.

American League Predictions for 2013

Last year was the first time I ever made actual predictions as to how the MLB standings would look at the end of the regular season. To say I did poorly would be an understatement, but this is a new year, and with it comes a new shot at getting the predictions right. So I’m up for the challenge once again.

Unlike 2012, when I posted both my American League and National League predictions in the same blog entry, this year I’m doing separate posts for each league. As the title states, I’m giving my 2013 American League standings predictions today, starting with the AL East:

EAST

1. Rays

2. Yankees

3. Orioles

4. Blue Jays

5. Red Sox

With the Yankees’ season uncertain, I see this as the year the Rays need to make their move. With the lineup they have, the Rays have the ability to win their division, but it’s going to come down to if their starting pitching begins and ends with David Price, or if their potential superstar pitchers in Matt Moore and Jeremy Hellickson can get things going. That’s the deciding factor, for me.

Although the Yankees’ season is up in the air, I still have them finishing second in the AL East. Why? Because they’re the Yankees; a team that seems to be able to always find a way to win. But it’s going to come down to Derek Jeter, in my opinion. If he misses a large chunk of the season, at any point, it could send my predictions way off course. Right now, I’m not too worried about him missing the first few games; but that could change.

The Orioles surprised everyone last season with the way they were able to put things together, however, I still think it’ll be 2014 before they stand a good chance of winning the division. Their phenom prospects are still far from ready, with top prospect Dylan Bundy beginning the season in AA Bowie, and I just don’t see everything clicking together in their favor this season.

I’m hesitant to place the Blue Jays all the way down in fourth, with so many people seeing them finishing near the top, but it’s the way I foresee their season panning out. Even with the offseason additions of R.A. Dickey, Josh Johnson, Jose Reyes, etc., I don’t see the Jays putting together a season much over .500. You just can’t buy chemistry, and with so many new faces, I don’t see them gelling from the start of the season.

What can I say about the Red Sox? They were once major competitors in the division, but after a couple of horrible seasons, by their standards, I don’t see this year being any better. They didn’t do much to improve their team in the offseason, and it’s going to show once the season starts up. I’m looking down the road, when their key prospects such as Jackie Bradley Jr. and Xander Bogaerts arrive, before I can see them getting things going in the right direction again.

CENTRAL

1. Tigers

2. Indians

3. White Sox

4. Royals

5. Twins

There’s truly no reason the Tigers shouldn’t run away with things in the AL Central division. With one of the best lineups in all of baseball, including sluggers Miguel Cabrera and Prince Fielder, along with newcomer Victor Martinez, their lineup should be there. The only question mark is their pitching. Justin Verlander is going to dominate–that’s a given–but the remainder of the rotation is a bit uncertain. But all in all, I think they’ll be just fine.

Coming in second, I have the Indians, as they did a great job of signing guys in the offseason to fill key spots they were missing last year, and I feel it’s bound to pay off in the coming season. The only concern would be their starting pitching. Without a true Ace, you don’t know who to look to for to carry the team throughout the season. It’s definitely something worth watching, however, they should be able to have enough decent pitching to make things very interesting in the division.

It was really a toss up between me placing the Indians or White Sox in third place (with the other in second) but I decided to have the Sox finishing third in the division. The Sox have a future Cy Young winner, in Chris Sale, but with the remainder of the pitching, as well as the lineup, a question mark, I can’t see them winning too many games over .500 in the 2013 season. They still have too many holes to fill.

I’m still questioning the Royals’ decision to trade away their phenom prospect, Wil Myers, along with a few other prospects, to the Rays, in exchange for a couple of middle of the rotation starting pitchers, on most teams, in James Shields and Wade Davis, but it is what it is. I see the move doing more harm than good. The Royals certainly needed starting pitching, but to trade away your top prospect is a poor choice, in my opinion, which is why I have them finishing next to last in the division.

The Twins are a team that have the potential to be very good a year or two down the road, but for right now, I see them having to endure another last place season, in their division. They just don’t have enough top notch guys, both in their pitching rotation and lineup, to make any sort of a run this season, as far as I can see.

WEST

1. Angels

2. Athletics

3. Rangers

4. Mariners

5. Astros

For the Angels, the AL West division is theirs to lose. With the addition of Josh Hamilton in the offseason, along with their already potent lineup of Albert Pujols and Mike Trout, there is no reason the Angels shouldn’t dominate the division. Although they lost Zack Greinke to the Dodgers, their rotation is still really good, and it should all combine to be enough to lead them to the playoffs for the first time since 2009.

The Athletics were one of the big surprises of last season, but I don’t feel it was a fluke. They’ve put together a really great team out in Oakland, and with the majority of the other teams in the division (with the exception of the Angels) still trying to figure things out in the coming season, the Athletics stand a good shot of making the playoffs for the second straight year.

With the loss of Josh Hamilton during the offseason, I don’t see the Rangers doing much of anything this year. While they have a few big bats in their lineup that can change the outcome of a game with one swing, I don’t see their rotation as being strong enough to overcome the uphill climb they face. It’ll be interesting to watch unfold, but I don’t like their chances in 2013.

The Mariners are one of the most interesting teams to keep track of. While I don’t see them having all that impressive of an upcoming season, with all of the talent they have knocking on the door of the big leagues, I feel they’ll be major contenders as early as next season. They don’t have all of the necessary pieces, just yet, to put together a playoff run, but starting in 2014, keep a lookout for the Mariners to do big things in the AL West division.

Last season was flat out ugly for the Astros, as they finished in dead last, with a league leading 107 losses. Being that they’re making the transition from the National League to the American League this year, I don’t see things being any better for them; but when you lose over 100 games in a season, it can’t really get all that much worse.

Leave a comment below with whether or not you agree with my predictions.

Click HERE to be taken to my National League predictions for 2013.

MLB Players Alternate Jobs

Before I get started with what will be my final Q and A post until after the playoffs have concluded, let me first start out by saying that yesterday’s AL and NL Wild Card games went completely opposite from what I had expected.

With the Braves having won the past 23 times Kris Medlen started the game on the mound, I though it was a sure bet that the Braves would get the win. But as you know, that’s not what happened. The Braves ended up falling to the Cardinals (6-3), thus making it their final game of 2012; and Chipper Jones’ last game of his career.

Furthermore, I fully expected the Rangers to beat the Orioles, and just like the Braves-Cards game, I was completely stunned by the end result. The Orioles pulled out the win, beating the Rangers 5-1, ending the Ranger’s chances of a third straight World Series appearance. Incredible; but that’s baseball for ya. Just because you’re the better team on paper, doesn’t mean you’ll always come out on top.

Now that I’ve given you my two cents on yesterday’s Wild Card games, I’ll now get on with the regularly scheduled blog post:

Have you ever wondered what MLB players would be doing had things not of worked out for them to play baseball? Well I did, which I why I spent last week on twitter asking players just that: “If you weren’t playing baseball what would you be doing?”

Of those who replied, some actually put some thought into it while others replied with a somewhat humorous answer. I’ll let you distinguish between the two:

Chris Gimenez–Tampa Bay Rays

Def a coach. Think it would be fun.

David Huff–Cleveland Indians

Probably either playing golf on the tour or teaching high school history.

David Aardsma–New York Yankees

Prob a model.

Denard Span–Minnesota Twins

I’d be doing something associated with sports.

Daniel McCutchen–Pittsburgh Pirates

Prob be a movie star or maye a rapper. Then again, I could always give politics a shot.

David Hernandez–Arizona Diamondbacks

I’d probably be in my 8th year of college trying to figure out what I wanna do.

Luis Exposito–Baltimore Orioles

I would find an occupation where I can help less fortunate kids and help make the world a better place!

Steve Cishek–Miami Marlins

P.E. teacher and coach.

Ricky Nolasco–Miami Marlins

Police Officer for sure.

Brandon Snyder–Texas Rangers

I always say military but who knows. My wife would say I would be a trainer or something.

Josh Lueke–Tampa Bay Rays

Professional outdoorsman like my buddy @IHuntStrong [and] @BackwoodsLife #outdoors4life

Brian Dozier–Minnesota Twins

Lead guitarist for a rock band.

Paul Maholm–Atlanta Braves

Something in golf.

Daniel Hudson–Arizona Diamondbacks

No idea. Probably coaching somewhere.

Thomas Neal–Cleveland Indians

Coaching somewhere.

Mike Olt–Texas Rangers

I would be a lion.

—————————————————————————————————

My next blog post will come tomorrow evening, and will detail my blogging plans for the next few weeks. So check back for that…

Miguel Cabrera’s Triple Crown Chances

Miguel Cabrera is currently leading the American League in RBI’s (133) and batting average (.329), while sitting just one back of Josh Hamilton in the home run category. (Hamilton has 43 dingers on the year.)

Obviously, for Cabrera to win the Triple Crown he’ll have to be leading the A.L. in home runs at the end of the season. In order to do so he’ll need to muscle together some power in the coming days to pass Hamilton in the home run category, and I just don’t see that happening. Sure, Cabrera is a power hitter and could certainly pull it off, but going against Hamilton I’d say it’s an uphill battle at best.

It seems like Hamilton hits a homer every other night, and it doesn’t help that Cabrera has been struggling somewhat at the plate lately. Home runs asside, if he doesn’t start hitting better, Cabrera’s at risk of falling into second place on the batting average list behind Joe Mauer, who (as I’m writing this) has a current batting average of .324.

While there’s a good chance that Cabrera will lead the league in RBI’s and batting average at the end of the season, the odds that he’ll crank out enough homers to pass Hamilton–who’ll more that likely hit a few more in the final stretch of the regular season–aren’t good, in my opinion.

So in conclusion, while I’m rooting for Miguel Cabrera to pull it out and become the first player to win the Triple Crown since Carl Yastrzemski, in 1967, I feel he’ll fall just short. Which will be a real shame, as Cabrera has had one heck of a year.

As always, feel free to leave a comment below.

Q and A With Cody Buckel

Cody Buckel was drafted by the Texas Rangers in the 2nd round of the 2010 draft. Since the initial draft Buckel has done just about as well as you’d imagine a second round pick would do; completely dominating thus far.

But it’s not as if dominating is new to Buckel, as he was able to do the same last season with low-A Hickory. Going 8-3, with a 2.61 ERA, as well as 120 strikeouts through 96.2 innings pitched. Good enough to earn Buckel a promotion to high-A Myrtle Beach for the 2012 season.

So far this season with the Pelican’s, Buckel has posted a 1.27 ERA through 11 starts. His win loss record stands at 4-2, but the thing that really stands out is his ability to get the strikeout. Buckel has struck out 81 batters in just 64 innings pitched. That comes out to 11.4 strikeouts per nine innings pitched. Truly remarkable numbers.

Cody Buckel–pitching prospect in the Texas Rangers organization–took the time recently to answer some of my questions:

1.) At what age did you first become interested in baseball? Did you always want to be a pitcher?

I started playing baseball at three years old. I found my interest in pitching at age eight, and wanted to be a pitcher since then.

2.) Who was your favorite baseball player growing up? Why?

Derek Jeter was my favorite player growing up. I just love how he approaches the game and how humble he is on the field and off. He plays hard and like it’s his last game everyday.

3.) You were drafted by the Rangers in the 2nd round of the 2010 draft. What was that process like for you? Where were you when you found out? Initial thoughts?

I was actually in my English class doing my final exam when I found out. I had my phone on my desk and told the teacher I might be getting a call that would start my career and she let me have it out. Fortunately I got the call from the Rangers and it was one of the happiest days of my life. I was excited to be a Ranger because a hall of fame pitcher being the owner of the team isn’t a bad thing to have.

4.) This is your 3rd season of professional baseball. What are your goals for this year? Anything specific that you’re currently working on to enable you to reach those goals?

Just trying to carry over from last years season to this year. I’ve tweaked some mechanical things and added a couple of pitches to my arsenal and they seem to be doing well out of the gate so far. I just need to be consistent through the year to continue to move up the ladder.

5.) What’s the most memorable moment of your baseball career thus far?

So far the playoff game I pitched last year at Greensboro has been my most memorable pro moment, but I threw a no hitter my senior year against a team I never really had success with. That has been my most memorable moment in my baseball career.

6.) When’s the first time someone asked for your autograph? Oddest thing you’ve ever signed?

First time someone asked for my autograph was one of my USA baseball cards. It felt weird signing a card of myself because I was the one asking for autographs not too long before that. Weirdest thing I signed was someones back. Haha.

7.) What’s your favorite thing to do on an off day during the season?

Definitely play a round of golf or just go to the mall or movies and chill, but if I can get out on a golf course I’ll be out there wearing my puma attire.

8.) Favorite food?

Dominoes pizza.

9.) Favorite TV show?

‘How I Met Your Mother’.

10.) Lastly, what advice would you give to kids who are just starting out that dream of playing professional baseball one day?

I would say no matter how long you play to make sure the game is always fun! Also, working hard and keeping up on your routines will pay off and create luck for you, and the game becomes even more fun when you have success.

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Big thanks to Cody Buckel for taking the time to answer my questions.

You can follow him on twitter: @Cheatcode07

Rangers Fan “Steals” Baseball From Little Kid

I’m sure by now you’ve seen the video and read numerous blogs discussing the incident that took place during last night’s Rangers game. If by some chance you haven’t, CLICK HERE to watch the video.

After watching the video several times my first thought was: “What’s the big deal?” The ball was tossed in the general direction of the kid, but there’s no way to know for sure as to whether or not he was the intended target. The ball was lobbed into the air, and thus was fair game.

The guy who ended up with the ball is getting tons of critisism because he didn’t give the ball to the kid. That doesn’t make sense to me. The guy did nothing wrong. He didn’t knock the kid down. He didn’t snatch it out of his hand/glove. Heck, he didn’t even reach in the kids direction. He picked the ball up off of the ground after it deflected off the hands of the 10 other guys in front of him who went for the ball. Why aren’t we upset at those guys too?

I truly don’t understand what makes kids so special that people seem to believe that if a ball lands within 100 feet of one, and an adult gets it, that they should immediately hand it to them. For a lot of people (adults included) they’ve never even come close to catching a ball. You know they have to be extremely excited when their moment of glory finally comes, and they get a ball. Why should they be required to hand over their souvenir?

Remember last season when the kid reached in front of the younger kid and snatched the baseball, only to return it back to the smaller kid moments later? Well, he was rewarded with tons of stuff. I guarantee you that the adult that came up with the ball last night would’ve recieved zip if he had of done the same. Why is that? What makes kids so much better than fully grown men? It baffles me.

I’ve never been lucky enough to get a baseball at a game. I’m sure I could easily get one if I tried hard enough, but for now I’m content with just sitting there observing. However, if that day in which I finally get a baseball comes in June, in Cincinnati, or 15 years down the road, I’m not going to hand the ball over to a kid; unless it’s my own. I don’t see why I should.

Now don’t get me wrong. I’m not trying to sound like a kid hater. I’m not by any means. (I have 4 cousins between the ages of 6 and 12, and I love them to death.) I’m simply saying that there is something wrong if you’re expected to hand over a baseball, or face being booed by thousands of people. It’s just a baseball.

I’ll admit, I’ve witnessed (in person) people tackle little kids for baseballs and keep them for themselves, but that guy last night did absolutely NOTHING wrong. Had he of tackled the kid, or snatched the ball from him I’d be bashing him like everyone else. But from my point of view, he was just doing what any person would do. He was just a fan, fulfilling the dream of any baseball fan: Catching a ball at a Major League Baseball game.

UPDATE

I’m aware of the more recent incident in Miami, and I still stand with my original thoughts on the matter. While it looked like the grown man took the ball from the girl, it actually appears to me that the ball would’ve been caught by the boy WITH THE GLOVE anyway. Whatever the case, for all we know, it might be the first ball that guy has EVER gotten. He shouldn’t be critisized just because of his age and size.

Please leave a comment with your opinion of the whole situation. Whichever side you’re on, I want to see what you (the reader) has to say.