Results tagged ‘ Twitter ’

Q and A With Chris Beck

Chris Beck was drafted by the White Sox in the 2nd round of the 2012 draft. Originally projected as a first round draft pick, a drop in velocity duringBeck his junior year of college led to a drop to late in the second round. But Beck has been able to prove his ability as a pitcher, posting good stats over his first two seasons of professional baseball.

After a good 2012, Beck had an even better 2013 season, going 13-10 with a 3.07 ERA in 26 starts. Beginning the year strong in High-A, Beck was selected to participate in the Carolina League/California League All-Star game, and was quickly promoted to Double-A afterwards, where he ended the year.

Beck is a player worth keeping a very close eye on. He should continue to post good stats, and could make it to the majors in the next year or two.

Chris Beck — top 10 prospect in the White Sox’ organization — took the time recently to answer some of my questions:

1.) At what age did you first become interested in baseball?

I’d say from the time I was able to walk. I always had my plastic ‘Fisher Price’ bat in my hands walking around the house.

2.) Who was your favorite baseball player growing up? Why?

Chipper Jones, hands down, because he was a Georgia boy right up the road in Atlanta.

3.) You were drafted by the White Sox in the 2nd round of the 2012 draft. What was that process like for you? Where were you when you first found out? Initial thoughts?

It was an amazing experience but stressful at the same time. I had upper first round buzz heading into my junior season, and I fell into the second round. So I had no idea when I was going to go, but [I’m] very lucky the White Sox took me when they did.

4.) Although you signed with the White Sox in 2012, you were originally drafted by the Indians in the 35th round of the 2009 draft. What made you decide to attend college instead of beginning your professional career?

Just my maturity situation. I had gone to a one-hallway high school in a small town, and [had] never really been away from home, ever. I knew I had some growing up to do before I could handle pro ball.

5.) You had a fairly successful first half to the year that earned you a spot in the 2013 Carolina League/California League All-Star game. What did it mean to you to be named to the team along with all the other great players in High-A baseball?

It was awesome just being able to be surrounded by that talent. You look now and most of the guys that played in the game moved to AA right after and continued their success. They could be in the big leagues at any point this next season, and that’ll be something cool to know I played beside them.

6.) After the All-Star game, you were promoted to Double-A. What kind of differences, if any, did you notice from the level of talent you began the first half of the year facing?

It’s just the margin of error is that much smaller. I’m very lucky that the Carolina league was loaded with great players and competition so I believe that helped with the transition. But back to AA, those guys are there for a reason and most are future or former big leaguers.

7.) Winning a World Series Championship is, obviously, every player’s dream, but while you haven’t yet had the opportunity to do so, you won the next best thing: The 2013 Southern League Championship, with the Birmingham Barons. What was that experience like, pitching in a Minor League playoff atmosphere? What did you take away from it?

I don’t think there’s one certain word that can describe that. It’s such a rush of emotions and adrenaline even when you’re not on the mound. You’re hanging on the rail during every pitch. And after playing for the love of the game, you play to win, and winning a championship is the ultimate prize.

8.) What do you feel went well in 2013? What are your goals for 2014?

2013 I gained loads of experience of it being my first full season. I learned a lot of how to treat your body (laying off Dunkin Donuts everyday) and when to push and when to let off in between starts. Staying healthy was my primary goal, and that happened. So into 2014 it’ll be a lot of the same — staying healthy and continuing to work on putting guys away. I walked a lot of guys in High-A this year and want to take what I did in AA into this coming Spring Training.

9.) Favorite TV show? Favorite food?

I really love ‘Duck Dynasty’ and, as mentioned before, donuts. Lol.

10.) Lastly, what advice would you give to kids who are just starting out that dream of playing professional baseball one day?

Biggest advice I could offer: Have fun! It’s a game, and it’s meant to be fun. When that stops happening something isn’t being done right, no matter what level you’re on.

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Big thanks to Chris Beck for taking the time to answer my questions.

You can follow him on Twitter: @WatchurBeck

Q and A With Brandon Barnes

Brandon Barnes was drafted by the Astros in the 6th round of the 2005 draft. Since the draft, Barnes has had his fair share of ups and downs, however, he was able to establish himself as a Major League Baseball player this past season. But his road to the big Brandon+Barnes+Los+Angeles+Angels+Anaheim+lKW78cGJLJMlleagues wasn’t an easy one.

Playing both football and baseball in high school, Barnes received scholarship offers to play football, but they fell through, leading him to the decision to be a baseball walk on at junior college. Getting drafted in 2005, Barnes began his professional baseball career, but it would be 2012 before he would finally make it to the Majors, despite posting solid numbers in the minors.

Barnes had a good 2012 (partial) season with the Astros, playing in 43 games to end the year, however, it wasn’t until the 2013 season that he was fully given the opportunity to show off his ability to play on the big league level, and play well. In 136 games, Barnes hit 8 home runs and drove in 41 runs, batting .240, including a cycle in the middle part of the season, as well as making several outstanding catches in the outfield throughout the year.

If Barnes can continue to put together the same type of caliber seasons, both offensively and defensively, he should find himself roaming the outfield in Houston for many years to come.

Brandon Barnes — outfielder for the Astros — took the time recently to answer some of my question:

1.) At what age did you first become interested in baseball? Who was your biggest baseball influence growing up?

From the stories my parents have told me, I was swinging a bat and throwing a ball at the age of two, but I remember becoming interested when I was about four. I would say with no doubt that my grandfather was my biggest baseball influence growing up. He was always teaching me something new.

2.) Who was your favorite baseball player growing up? Why?

Growing up an Angels fan, I was always a huge fan of Jim Edmonds. I just loved the way he played. He was one of the best center fielders in the game, and he was always flying around the outfield.

3.) While in school, you played both football and baseball. What ultimately made you choose baseball?

My senior year of High School I actually quit baseball to concentrate more on football. I had some scholarship offers from some Division 1 schools, so I wanted to put all my time and effort into my school work and football. At the end of my senior year my scholarships were given to other players, and I was devastated, but I knew God had a plan. I decided to follow God’s path for me and walk on at Cypress Junior College to pursue baseball.

4.) You were drafted by the Astros in the 6th round of the 2005 draft. What was that process like for you? Where were you when you first found out? Initial thoughts?

I really did not know a whole lot about the draft and the draft process. I was just told to tune in on the computer and that I could possibly be drafted. I was at my Grandfather’s house listening on the computer. I just remember waiting and waiting, and just wanting to leave to go workout. I didn’t think I was getting drafted as high as I did. It was another blessing from God on his path for me. I was so happy, and at the same time had no idea what was going to happen next. I think I was a little overwhelmed.

5.) You spent eight seasons in the minors before finally making your MLB debut in the late part of 2012. Did it become discouraging at any point, wanting to get to the majors while being told that you never would? Did being told you wouldn’t ever make it add even more emotion to the experience during your debut?

Spending eight years in the minors was like a roller coaster for me. There were a lot of ups and downs, but with a little more downs than ups. There were a couple times where I just wanted to call it quits and go back and try to play football. My motivation was the people that told me I wasn’t going to make it. I was going to prove them all wrong and at the same time prove all the people that supported me right. There were a lot of emotions the day of my debut but no better feeling than seeing my wife and daughter in the stands. All the hard work and sacrifices that my wife had made so that I can play baseball had just overcome me, and I was so happy.

6.) This season, in addition to a fairly good offensive year, you made a lot of great plays in the outfield. Do you take more pride in your defensive game or your offensive game? What do you do to work on both?

I take a lot of pride in both parts of my game, [but] defense comes a lot more natural. I think I actually work harder on my offense. I work extremely hard on both making sure that I can help the team win on both sides. During the season I shag like it’s a real game, and I have a strict routine for my offense that I try and stick to.

7.) Back in July you hit for just the eighth cycle in Astros history. What was going through your head in your final at-bat, knowing you needed a double to complete the cycle? Would you consider that your most memorable moment of your career thus far? 

Going into that at-bat, I was aware of what was going on; just not trying to put pressure on myself. I was singing my walk-up song trying to stay calm and trick my mind. I would have to say that is one of the most memorable moments of my career for sure.

8.) What do you feel went well in 2013? What are your goals for 2014?

In 2013 I was able to show all the aspects of my game and prove that I can play in the big leagues. My goals for 2014 are to come back a more complete player, to have a better approach at the plate and to be a little faster for the base paths and defense.

9.) Favorite TV show? Favorite food?

Favorite TV show is ‘Dexter’ and favorite food is fish and sushi.

10.) Lastly, what advice would you give to kids who are just starting out that dream of playing professional baseball one day?

My advice would be to practice as much as possible but have fun every second. This is a fun game, not a nine to five job. Try to learn something new about the game everyday and never give up. Don’t listen to the people that tell you that you will never make it.

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Big thanks to Brandon Barnes for taking the time to answer my questions.

You can follow him on Twitter: @TheBarnyard15

Top MLB Player Twitter Accounts

Below are the top 10 twitter accounts out of all the current MLB players on twitter. The list is based on how often the player tweets, and interacts with fans through twitter replies, RT’s, and twitter contests:

1.) Brandon Phillips– @DatDudeBP

Wether it’s a twitter contest or just plain old twitter replies, Brandon always seems to be interacting with his followers/fans.

2.) David Price– @DAVIDprice14

Does his best to reply to what seems like every tweet that someone sends him. Very active tweeter.

3.) R.A. Dickey– @RADickey43

Although he’s still getting used to twitter, R.A. does a great job of answering his fans questions that they send him.

4.) Logan Morrison– @LoMoMarlins

His timeline is full with hilarious tweets, as well as TONS of replies to fans that have tweeted him. Great tweeter. (Just don’t mention the words “preying” and “mantis” in the same tweet.)

5.) Jimmy Rollins– @JimmyRollins11

Has been doing really well lately on twitter with replying to his fans tweets. He seems to really appreciate them.

6.) Denard Span– @thisisdspan

Another great tweeter that loves to interact with his fans on twitter. Just an all around great guy.

7.) Justin Turner– @redturn2

Is really good about answering questions that fans ask him. He is also a funny guy. Always has something on his mind.

8.) Peter Moylan– @PeterMoylan

Tweets a lot about his teamates, but also makes time for responding to his fans tweets. Great tweeter.

9.) LaTroy Hawkins– @Adidas219

Great about responding to his fans. LaTroy also holds contests for prizes, from time to time.

10.) Joba Chamberlain– @Joba_62

Funny dude as well as being a good responder to tweets his fans send him.

Honorable Mentions (Not in above list since they’re retired from MLB.)

-Chuck Knoblauch– @chuckknoblauch

Chuck does a great job of responding to nearly every tweet that someone sends him. He also gives away ten autographed pictures for every 1,000 followers he gets. Awesome guy/tweeter.

-Bernie Williams– @bw51official

Bernie enjoys interacting with his fans on twitter. Is good about responding to tweets that he recieves. Tweets about his new book, his concert dates, and just baseball in general. Great tweeter.

That’s my top ten MLB tweeters list. If you have others in mind that should be on the list, leave a comment. I’d love to hear your thoughts…..

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